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Best links for writers and publishers (May, 16)

16 May 2011 in international | questo post è lungo 675 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter_ to get frequent updates. [Previous]._

THE FUTURE OF BOOK REVIEWS: CRITICS VS. AMAZON REVIEWERS

"In the age of rapid digital revolution in publishing, when readers have book review options ranging from decades-old publications like The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, and The New York Times Book Review, to Twitter book clubs, literary websites, online publications like this one, and Amazon reader reviews, what is the role of the book reviewer? And how has that role changed?" thedailybeast.com

THE FALL OF BOOK PUBLISHING: THE RISE OF NEW E-BOOK BUSINESS MODELS

"Yes, people will still pay to purchase books, but they may be willing to pay far more for a variety of other ways to engage on the topic. Hosted mastermind sessions, subscription newsletters, interactive telepresence calls, one-on-one consulting, and paid appearances and speaking gigs are all options that next-gen publishers will consider as they calculate the value of a new unpublished work. Much of this already goes on today, but continued experimentation will pave the way into virgin territory. Some books will include ads, both in-text and display ads to help the bottom line. A few will experiment with product placement strategies, affiliate marketing, and other ideas for cross-promoting products. Pushing Costs Back Onto the Authors." impactlab.net

IAIN M BANKS: SCIENCE FICTION IS NO PLACE FOR DABBLERS

"The point is that science fiction is a dialogue, a process. All writing is, in a sense; a writer will read something – perhaps something quite famous, even a classic – and think "But what if it had been done this way instead . . . ?" And, standing on the shoulders of that particular giant, write something initially similar but developmentally different, so that the field evolves and further twists and turns are added to how stories are told as well as to the expectations and the knowledge of pre-existing literary patterns readers bring to those stories." guardian.co.uk

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN A LITERARY AGENT PUBLISHES A BESTSELLER?

"Earlier this week I noted that Ed Victor's move into publishing was a sign that other agents would follow: where Victor shines a light, others will surely look. It didn't take long, as this story in The Bookseller showed, both Blake Friedman and Curtis Brown are also actively considering crossing the line. In fact, some agents seem to have changed their minds in a matter of weeks." futurebook.net

*DOES A LARGE ONLINE FOLLOWING GUARANTEE AN AUTHOR READERS? *

"The fact is that someone who follows you on Twitter or reads your blog might not be receptive to make the leap into books. Not only is the format different, there’s the fact that they will now have to pay for the material — much of which may have already appeared in one form or another." publishingperspectives.com

AMAZON BOOK SALES PAGE TIPS WITH CAROLYN MCCRAY

"You have maybe 15 seconds to catch someone’s attention before they surf onwards. So it needs to be eye catching visual and sales material in the product description. It’s like an ad in a glossy magazine. The ‘meta-message’ is really important – the kind of overall sense of your page in terms of rank, image, quotes and stats. Success breeds success." thecreativepenn.com

HOW AGENTS CAN AVOID CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

"I’ve banged on agents pretty hard during the past few days. I believe the current trend for agents to sign their clients to long-term publishing contracts with an in-house agency publisher is not a good idea for several reasons. [...] Literary agents are not the only group that experiences conflict of interests issues. In other professions, methods and procedures for dealing with COI have been developed which provide some ideas agents could and should consider." thepassivevoice.com

PUBLISHING NEWS: HOW TO IMPROVE EBOOK MARGINALIA

"Is anyone happy with today's ebook note-taking tools? I'm talking about what you get with Kindle, Nook, iBooks, and so on. You can highlight passages and add notes, but that's pretty much where things start and stop." radar.oreilly.com

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