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Best links for writers and publishers (June, 10)

10 Jun 2011 in international | questo post è lungo 1198 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter_ to get frequent updates. [Previous]._

WHEN HARD BOOKS DISAPPEAR

"We are in a special moment that will not last beyond the end of this century: Paper books are plentiful. They are cheap and everywhere, from airports to drug stores to libraries to bookstores to the shelves of millions of homes. There has never been a better time to be a lover of paper books. But very rapidly the production of paper books will essentially cease, and the collections in homes will dwindle, and even local libraries will not be supported to house books -- particularly popular titles. Rare books will collect in a few rare book libraries, and for the most part common paper books archives will become uncommon. It seems hard to believe now, but within a few generations, seeing a actual paper book will be as rare for most people as seeing an actual lion." The Technium | @kevin2kelly

AMAZON'S SUNSHINE PROGRAM IS ANOTHER WAKE-UP CALL FOR THE BIG SIX

"These books are not from the big agency publishers, who set their own prices. Amazon apparently reached out to smaller publishers and worked out deals with them. Amazon could have simply cut these prices themselves, but doing that would require them to take a big margin hit. More likely, the markdown is being shared. (And, in addition, Amazon has plenty of books priced in that band all the time that could simply be featured in this promotion.)" The Idea Logical Company | @MikeShatzkin

TRADITIONAL VS. INDIE PUBLISHING

"But here's the point I'm trying to make: I believe that the number of serious, dedicated authors who make it big through indie publishing methods is neither statistically greater nor statistically less than those who make it big through traditional methods. It's a tough ride either way, and most of us are likely to stumble off to the sidelines puking long before we see any significant money. I don't think independent authors are any less likely to prove their mettle than traditionally published authors and frankly, I'm tired of listening to aspiring professionally-oriented writers sneer down their noses at indie publishing. Yes, every hack with a keyboard can slap junk onto kindle, but those people were never really in the competition to begin with. Junk won't sell. Good stories will sell." Nancyfulda | @NancyFulda

WHY THE SHORT STORY IS STILL ALIVE AND WELL

"If you write short stories that are longer than 2,500 words - don't. Nowhere will take them. If you write short stories that don't appear to be thinly veiled versions of your own life or that of your relatives - don't. The lifestyle magazines will find them unacceptable, if not alarming. If you write short stories that involve swearing, or strange acts and disturbing details - don't. BBC radio won't touch them, ditto for mags and newspapers. If you save up the varied, strange, long, lively stories that came to you to be expressed and get them published as a collection - well... still don't. You'll be very lucky to get reviewed and the big prizes that get publishers' and publicists' attention are reserved for the novel. And you'll sell poorly. But you'll write the stories anyway. You know in your heart as a writer and a reader that short stories play a vital role in our literature. Their intensity and brevity may make them uniquely suited for a restless age." The Independent | @theindyarts

COULD PIRATES BE YOUR FRIENDS?

"The cost of combating piracy — a tedious and sometimes fruitless exercise — may, in such cases, far exceed the cost in lost sales from having those titles available for free, he added. Allowing more obscure titles to change hands freely on the Web might even result in buzz, which could eventually translate to more sales, Kiely added. But fellow panelist Christoph Brem, vice president of sales for the Attributor Corporation, a company that foils pirates on behalf of publishers (including a handful of university presses), was quick to draw a distinction between “guerilla marketing” strategies aimed at creating new markets by seeding old ones with free copies of a product, and failing to pursue pirates whose thievery could theoretically produce similar results. The difference is control, Brem said." Inside Higher Ed | @IHEtech

PETTY EXPECTATIONS - BY URSULA K. LE GUIN

"All novels (except perhaps those by Marguerite Duras) have to move forward, and plot-driven novels have to move with some apparent, though often indirect, onward impetus; but the movement certainly need not be “all to narrative resolution.” In narrative, impetus and pace are their own reward. What is essential is continuity — keeping the story going. (None of its many devoted readers for the last 260 years would ever have got through Clarissa if its interminably prolonged story weren’t told with unfailing (epistolary) continuity, as well as considerable variety of pace — given that its general rate of progress is that of a coach drawn by one ailing horse on a very bad road in January.) Where the story goes is much less important, during the telling of it, than that it goes." Book View Cafe Blog

8 WAYS TO DEVELOP BETTER RELATIONSHIPS WITH BLOGGERS

"When authors come to me and say, “I want to reach book bloggers or mommy bloggers,” I often have to tell them that bloggers have very specific tastes. More specific than you probably realize. For example, when reaching out to mommy bloggers, it is really important to know the age of their kids. Pitching a YA novel to a mommy blogger with a baby won’t get you far. Pitching a Sci-Fi novel to a blogger that loves historical romance won’t work either. Sending a WWII book to a blogger that covers the Civil War will make for a cranky blogger, and sending a press release to the wrong person may actually get you black listed. So here are some tips to help you develop better relationships with bloggers." Digital Book World | @FauziaBurke

THE SERIOUS BUSINESS OF 21ST-CENTURY BOOK PUBLISHING

"The overall sense in publishing is that, rather than being pushed to the margins of the information and entertainment revolution, the industry is making dramatic changes with skill and flexibility that surprises everyone involved. As I've written many times before, there will be winners and losers (the collapse of Borders and its struggle to get out of bankruptcy shows how destructive mismanagement can be). There are innumerable questions." The Atlantic

ON THE BOOK BLOGGER CONVENTION AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BLOGGERS AND PUBLISHERS

"We bloggers do what we do because we love reading. Because of this shared love for reading, we occupy a unique position in the increasingly effective online world – people trust us and our opinions. Or, they hate us and our opinions. The point is, people hear us and engage, individually and collectively. This amounts to a helluva lot in a world where professional review outlets are shrinking and communities are becoming more socially driven by the powers of teh interwebs. The truth is, fellow readers and bloggers, we are far more influential than we may think." The Book Smugglers | @booksmugglers

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