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The Pottermore Effect

24 Jun 2011 in international | questo post è lungo 966 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter_ to get frequent updates. [Previous]._

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BOOK PUBLISHING FINALLY HAS ITS "RADIOHEAD MOMENT" WITH HARRY POTTER

"The crucial parallel between Radiohead and Rowling is the fact that they both put their faith in the fans rather than any intermediary. For Radiohead, this meant self-releasing their album In Rainbows after the end of their contract with EMI with an honesty-box pricing strategy. For Rowling it means keeping the e-books DRM-free and trusting her fans not to pirate her works rather than assuming that they will. Rowling is instead opting for a digital watermarking system that links the identify of the purchaser to the copy of the ebook. This doesn't prevent people sharing copies on the web, but does try to ensure that any copies will be traceable to a buyer." Wired | @Olivia_Solon

HOW POTTERMORE WILL REVOLUTIONIZE PUBLISHING: 4 PREDICTIONS

"On Thursday, Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling cleared up the "mystery" of her Pottermore website. As many suspected, it will be an exclusive venue for selling the books in e-book form directly to consumers as well as a social networking site for Potter heads. Given that Rowling has, to date, stubbornly refused to make Harry and Co. available via e-reader, what does this development mean for the publishing industry?" The Week

J. K. ROWLING'S NEXT CHAPTER: A TRANSFIGURATION SPELL ON THE PUBLISHING INDUSTRY

"That's big news for e-books as the bestselling series will undoubtedly be wildly successful in its new e-format. (It's as good an excuse as any to reread all the novels, right?) But the announcement is significant in a number of other key ways, not just because of Rowling's decision to release the e-books now, but because of the way in which she has chosen to do it." ReadWriteWeb | @audreywatters

THREE WAYS POTTERMORE.COM COULD CHANGE BOOK PUBLISHING

"The first book Harry Potter book was published in 1997—over a decade ago. Kids who were too young for the books when they were first published—who were, say, four or five in 2007 when Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, the final book in the series, was released—are just the right age for the e-book editions in 2011. And, of course, the series has always exhibited massive crossover appeal between kids and adults. Adults who never read the books the first time around might try them as e-books, and audiences who’ve read them already may still want to own the digital versions, particularly since Rowling is writing new material for the e-books." paidContent | @laurahazardowen

HARRY POTTER NEXT CHAPTER? WIZARD WEBSITE TELLS AND SELLS ALL

"The agent Jonny Geller, of Curtis Brown, said Rowling's move may be something of a gamechanger in terms of how bestselling authors engage with their readers. «This does feel like a significant moment,» he said. «If I was a brand author I would be asking my publisher how to get to the online communities that JK Rowling is getting to. It might be a wakeup call to think of a new way of getting to readers.» But Geller said other authors could follow suit. The bar had been set extremely high, he said. «It is not by any means the end of traditional publishing but it may be a gamechanger in how global brands, the authors, can reach their readers.»" The Guardian

POTTERMORE LESSONS (WHICH I REFUSE TO CALL "LEARNINGS")

"Because Harry Potter is a brand which can stand alone. But look, seriously: this is a powerful way of doing things and it's one which booksellers and publishers can do for themselves. They can (you can) develop a brand identity which becomes a go-to destination. Did you like, say, Ben Aaronovitch's Moon Over Soho? Good! Go to the Gollancz website and click to buy and download the next one! (No, all right, you can't, and when you try you actually get morphed to Orion Books, which makes perfect sense to anyone who works in our industry but is ridiculous if you don't) but you should be able to. I'm not taking a pop at Gollancz, by the way; their site is friendlier than many." The Future Book | @Harkaway

WHAT'S COMING OVER THE HILL?

"The key difference is that in the seventies it was the young, thrusting paperback houses – the Headline’s of this world - who, by simply showing greater market savvy were able to grow fast and swallow up their venerable and far bigger competitors. It was an organic process. The difference now is that the interlopers are not sleek minnows but Amazon, Google and Apple. Corporate giants capable of swallowing publishers whole. Relationships between agents and publishers are often strained but I have yet to meet an agent who relishes the prospect of those three dominating the publishing landscape. It is hard to see that as a world that would be better for writers." The Future Book

IF BIG AUTHORS DO NOT NEED BIG PUBLISHERS, THEN WHAT ARE BIG PUBLISHERS FOR?

"If big authors do not need big publishers then what are big publishers for? An author’s ties of loyalty to publishers are, rightly, often enormous: most feel their success is shared with the team who have helped build it. Publishing is a deeply collaborative process and most publishers are passionate about what they do: there are many reasons for authors to want to be loyal to publishers. However, the disparity between what the worlds biggest authors are capable of earning by publishing their own e-books and what their publishers are offering them has grown so enormous that that loyalty is being severely tested. We are talking about millions of pounds." The Future Book

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