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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (July, 11)

11 Jul 2011 in international | questo post è lungo 917 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days.
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AMAZON HOLD BACK THE GROWTH OF E-BOOKS AROUND THE WORLD

"Writers often wonder why the growth of e-books is so much slower in the rest of the world. There are a number of reasons for that, but one big factor is the $2 surcharge that Amazon levies on all e-books in most international countries. This charge is levied by Amazon, and kept by Amazon, and has nothing to do with taxes."
David Gaughran | @DavidGaughran

THE BOOK IS NOT DEAD, IT'S JUST SHAPE-SHIFTING

"Now that the Great Panic of 2000-2010, the world of print's freak-out at the threat of digital, is subsiding, at least in the world of books, we can begin to discern the shape of the future and enumerate the potentially positive aspects of this historic paradigm shift. Make no mistake: as in every previous IT revolution, there will be (already is) a creative dividend. For instance, the print boom of 1590-1610 liberated Shakespeare and his successors, from Jonson to Donne, and sponsored an explosion of ephemeral publications, the inky compost that would nurture the best of the Jacobeans."
The Observer

DISCOVERABILITY: AUTHORS RESPONSIBILITY IN FINDING BOOK BUYERS

"In marketing I learned that it takes multiple exposures of someone’s product to get them to buy. The first time they hear about it, the information goes in one ear and out the other. After three or four mentions they start paying attention, and by six or nine mentions, they actually decide whether to buy or not. So I suspect that seeing a review on a blog, then hearing from a friend that they liked the book, then finally seeing the book in the “also bought” when cruising Amazon for a new read all contribute. What this tells me is that there are a few things authors have to focus on."
Write to Publish | @rsullivan9597

THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE: SCI-FI DOESN'T HAVE TO BE STUPID

"If you think the term "intelligent science-fiction" is an oxymoron, like "Australian culture", you probably won't enjoy this column. If you are impatient with films that speculate on how technological change might affect human behaviour, you should shift your eyes to the reality-based material elsewhere on this page.
But if you are the kind of person who is alarmed that Transformers: Dark of the Moon sold more than a million tickets in its first week in Australian cinemas, because that suggests filmgoers are morons, encourages the making of more monotonous blockbusters and attaches a bad smell to all sci-fi, read on. You might find some reason to smile."
Brisbane Times

NEW YORK WORKS AS A QUALITY FILTER

"The myth I am hearing more and more lately because of electronic and POD publishing is: Selling a novel to traditional publishing will guarantee the novel is quality. Or conversely, not selling a novel to traditional publishing will mean the novel is not quality. This is so flat wrong in so many ways, I’m not sure where to begin."
Dean Wesley Smith | @DeanWesleySmith

WITH TRADITIONAL PUBLISHING DIES THE PASSIVE WRITER-VICTIM

"With respect to my own work, I had to realize that some NY Editors are sufficiently egotistical to believe that they are so advanced in their educations and outlook that a book they find "fascinating" could not possibly engage a more general audience (unless it includes vampires or comes with pictures, of course). That, and the fact that their marketing sense and infrastructures are as outmoded and inefficient as the rest of their business, so they only have the ability to sell books that run the gamut from A to C to audiences that are equally diverse. Finally, I had to accept both the death of my romantic vision of publishing and the gross facts of the corporate publishing reality. With my agent's help and blessing, I found the tools and mustered the will to do things differently."
HuffpostBooks - Leonce Gaiter

SWIMMING LESSONS FOR HOUSE SLAVES: NO ONE WILL SWIM FOR YOU

"This “indy” publishing revolution is not, contrary to the belief of many, about money. It’s actually about independence. With independence comes responsibility; and it’s this need to accept responsibility that scares a lot of people. And I’m not just talking about writers. It scares publishers, too, because, up to this point, they’ve thrust all the responsibility for whether or not books sell on the authors. If the books don’t sell—despite a lack of publicity or merchandising, crappy covers, unrealistic ebook price points and a nihilistic pricing and returns policy—the fault lies with the author. We all know this is true. As John F. Kennedy said, “Victory has a thousand fathers, defeat is an orphan.” If a book does well, everyone within the publishing company knows it was their brilliance that made it do well. If it fails, it was the author’s fault. (Or the fault of tasteless readers in the fly-over states who can’t recognize brilliance.)"
Stormwolf.com

THE GREATEST BOOKS THAT NEVER WERE

"Imaginary books seem to be nearly as numerous as the real ones, and that's even when you don't count all those bestselling thrillers people believe they'll write someday if only they can find the time to write the damn thing down. Nonexistent books certainly have some devoted fans, such as the proprietor of the ever-diverting Beachcomber's Bizarre History Blog, who is making bold moves to expand the collection known as the Invisible Library."
Salon.com | @magiciansbook

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