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Literary Agents Reinventing Themselves

14 Jul 2011 in international | questo post è lungo 625 parole

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AGENTS ASSISTING AUTHORS WITH SELF PUBLISHING, GOOD IDEA?

Julie OrtolonAs more and more established authors go indie, either by e-pubbing their backlist or taking new material straight to ebook, many of us wonder: What will be the agent’s role in this new publishing frontier?
That conversation came up repeatedly during the recent RWA conference in NYC. Among the authors I spoke with, everyone agrees that agents actually 
becoming_ publishers is a bad idea.
But, what about agents assisting their authors with self publishing?
Julie Ortolon | @JulieOrtolon_

AGENTS STEERING AUTHORS TOWARD SELF-PUBLISHING

Weinstein took on the “nuts and bolts” role of publishing the e-book, carrying out tasks like hiring a copy editor, finding a cover designer and talking to e-book conversion firms, while Devlin is responsible for picking up those actual expenses. A traditional publisher, by contrast, would cover all those costs.
Weinstein, who represents nonfiction authors exclusively, thinks e-singles could be a major growth area for his clients. “I’m asking them, ‘While you think about your next big book,’” he says, “‘is there a 15,000 word-er that you could do in the meantime?’”
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LET'S TALK: AGENTS AS PUBLISHERS (A RECAP)

Be informed. That’s the key.
So let’s look at what different industry professionals have to say about this. In many of these posts there are gold nuggets of info in the comments.
Laura Pauling | @LauraPauling

LITERARY AGENTS REINVENTING THEMSELVES

With the publishing industry undergoing cataclysmic changes, and with self-publishing now a viable option for authors, it's only natural that literary agents are scrambling to position themselves.
How are they going to make money in this new publishing business? How are they going to be relevant?
Lee Goldberg | @LeeGoldberg

I HEARD AGENTS ARE GOING AWAY

Those people who seem to think the agents are going away are simply those people who seem to think they will make millions of dollars from their self-publishing sales on Smashwords or other platform. In their world, there is no need for an agent. For that approach, you're right. You don't need me or any other agent. But, with that said, when things do go wrong for your writing career, when you don't find yourself where you want to be with your writing in 5, 10, or 20 years, remember that maybe, just maybe, that agent that you avoided early in your career might have been able to help you over that hurdle.
Scott Eagan | @Greyhausagency (via @elizabethscraig)

THE PROS AND CONS OF HAVING A LITERARY AGENT REPRESENT YOU TO PUBLISHERS

Many aspiring authors are confused about whether or not they need a literary agent in order to get their books published.  The short answer to this question is no, you don’t have to have a literary agent to get a publishing contract.  However, it’s not necessarily that simple.
This post helps you understand the pros and cons of having a literary agent, so you can determine whether or not you want to try to secure an agent before you try to sell your book to a publisher.
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*THOUGHTS ON TRADITIONAL PUBLISHING, AGENTS AND SELF-PUBLISHING *

I met with two agents and spent more time explaining what we were doing than getting information from them.
During other conversations with agents and editors, it was quite clear to me that most had little idea of how effective ebook selling worked when the author is motivated to do it—ie profit sharing.  I’m selling 2,000 ebooks a day and expanding in sales every week.  From just a couple of hundred in a month in January, that’s an explosion.
Bob Mayer | @Bob_Mayer

Bonus: 116 literary agents to follow on Twitter

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