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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (July, 22)

22 Jul 2011 in international | questo post è lungo 892 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter_ to get frequent updates. [Previous]._

Note: Don't miss Secret Lives by Jeff VanderMeer. Launch offer ($ 0.99 | £ 0.71) | Giveaway on SFSignal!

TOP TEN: THE DIVIDE BETWEEN THE PUBLISHED AND THE SELF-PUBLISHED

"7. Some traditional authors are very concerned about the change in gatekeepers. It’s not a small group of editors anymore. The market is the gatekeeper. Democracy can be scary because the group may go where you don’t want it to go. There’s still a very strong market for vampire books and bodice-ripper romances and yes, even the Jersey Shore, for instance. If actual readers don’t want your fiction, there might still be a market for it with traditional publishing (which, by the way, isn’t disappearing completely) but traditional publishing is less adventurous the bigger the press. You’ll have better luck with a small press or DIY. It’s as if the kids who ran the chess club suddenly had to contend with a bunch of dumb jocks getting a voting membership…and the lunkheads want a kegger." Chazz Writers | @RChazzChute

CAN SHORT FORM CONTENT DELIVER MORE THAN EYEBALLS?

"The big questions with short-form content going forward may not be about whether to do it, but where to do it. Tales of e-originals outside the Singles store, which publishers have been experimenting with to different degrees for a few years now, are certainly more varied. Adam Bellow, recently talking to PW about Voices of the Tea Party, his first e-only series at his new imprint Broadside Books, admitted that sales had been underwhelming." Publishers Weekly | @PublishersWkly

THE THING ABOUT SELF-PROMOTION IS THAT SELF PROMOTION SUCKS (BUT YOU HAVE TO DO IT ANYWAY)

"So basically: Self-promotion = not fun! And yet I know what I would tell someone else who has a new book out: You have to do it. No matter how much you might dislike it, no matter how much negative feedback you get about it, no matter how much it makes you cringe, you gotta do it. You have to give your book a boost, you have to make your network aware of it, you have to do everything you can to help it sell. The era of being just an author, if it ever existed, is over." Nathan Bransford | @NathanBransford

THE (LOW) COST OF READING

"And now, able to buy the books, I don’t complain about the money I spend on them: hard covers, paperbacks, or e-books. Instead, I am thankful beyond belief that these books are out there to keep me going, just as they always have. There’s a good chance I’ll get some unhappiness from this. I’ll be told that I don’t understand. I’ll get tons of charts and analysis. And I hate to make folks unhappy, so I’ll need to relax. The average price of a massage is $60.00. Or I can get another book." Beyond the Margins

TO MONETIZE SOCIAL MEDIA, HUMANIZE IT

"The executives' skepticism seems to be rooted in the remarkably persistent idea that social media somehow is not worth their time, a fad, or not for serious business. I'm here to argue that their position is not only foolish, but also irresponsible. When I try to explain why — there are, after all, nearly a billion people using Facebook and Twitter alone — they of course play the "monetization" card: "Yeah, Amy, it's neat, and that's a lot of people, but how do we monetize it? We can't make money off of social media, so why should I invest in it?"" HBR Blog Network | @AmyJoMartin

8 REASONS WHY WE'RE ENTERING A GOLDEN AGE FOR SELF-PUBLISHING

"5. Prejudices are starting to crack More authors are moving to ebooks, and ebooks are even easier to self-publish than print books. The attraction of 70% royalties is strong, of course, but so is the ability to control your own publication, something that's long been denied to authors. Publishers have given over more responsibility to authors to build their own platform, to do a lot of their own marketing. But this has also empowered authors to take the autonomy and exercise real choices over their own publications." XinXii | @JFbookman

AUTHOR BLOGGING: YOU'RE DOING IT WRONG, BUT JOHN LOCKE'S FIGURED IT OUT

"Locke credits the majority of his sales to thesese blog posts, many of which went viral. Readers identified with them and shared them with their friends, and many ended up buying his books. I find his idea of viral marketing intriguing, and I’m curious as to how to generalizable it is. My own experience with blogging has been that it's very hard to predict what will go viral. I can probably guess with above-chance accuracy whether a blog will do well, but there’s a huge amount of uncertainty. Sometimes I’ll slave away at a blog post for days, just to have it fall flat, while other times I'll dash off a throwaway post that gets an enthusiastic response. In fact, I only have one blog post that truly went viral, and I actually thought was very mundane when I was writing it. That'd be an interesting study -- see how good bloggers are at predicting a post's success, and see how much that prediction accuracy increases with experience." A Brain Scientist's Take on Writing | @lkblackburne

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