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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (July, 27)

27 Jul 2011 in international | questo post è lungo 1341 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter_ to get frequent updates. [Previous]._

DEATH OF THE BOOKSHOP: WHAT YOU PAY FOR WHEN YOU BUY LOCAL

"The supply-chain earthquake that ebooks will cause aside, the tide of consumers who don’t care if their bookshop disappears, replaced by an IKEA-sized book factory on the other side of the world, will be enough to force the local industry to change. So have no fear: the book industry will adjust itself. At the same time, those of us who care about more than price should buy with our eyes open, knowing that with our purchases we are also, in part, choosing the kind of local bookish community that is left at the end of that process." Crickey | @matthiadempsey

PAPERBACK PUBLISHERS QUICKEN THEIR PACE

"Publishers say they have a new sense of urgency with the paperback, since the big, simultaneous release of hardcover and electronic editions now garners a book the bulk of the attention it is likely to receive, leaving the paperback relatively far behind. They may also be taking their cues from Hollywood, where movie studios have trimmed marketing costs by steadily closing the gap between the theatrical release of films and their arrival on DVD. “I’m looking to do it more and more,” Jane von Mehren, the publisher of trade paperbacks at Random House, said of releasing paperbacks early. “We feel as though there is this trade paperback book buyer that we want to make sure is still getting served. The idea that someone would wait for a year is an assumption that we should no longer make. So we’re looking at shortening the window.”" The New York Times

INFLUENCERS

"Now, contrast that with how many people tweet you or don’t, who posts links to your stuff or who doesn’t, whether such and such replies to you or doesn’t, and tell me that online influence has a lot to do with real world influence. No matter how much I’d like to believe that telling you how much I love my Chevy Camaro will influence you to buy cars, it won’t. (And if it did, I’d want a cut.) It just doesn’t work that way. You might have a slightly better opinion of something because I say it’s interesting or great or whatever, but I rarely influence someone to take an action of that nature. However, most online scoring systems would suggest that I have the potential to influence that kind of change." Chris Brogan | @chrisbrogan

IS READING FICTION GOOD FOR YOU?

"The idea that fiction is not just the writer's creation, but a co-conspiracy between writer and reader, is a central theme in Such Stuff As Dreams. Written by novelist and cognitive psychologist Keith Oatley, the book covers a lot of ground, from the evolution of language and the origins of creativity to the mechanics of empathy and theory of mind. Oatley goes to great lengths to build a psychological theory of fiction - delving into the effects of fiction on the minds of readers and authors, how we identify with characters, the way that stories move us, how they can change the way we see ourselves and how they might even improve our social skills." NewScientist | @newscientist

WRITERS' BLOG: 5 ESSENTIALS FOR ENGAGING YOUR READERS

"Traveling the web, you come across many of these blogs. Some are lively places where readers and bloggers spend time together. Too many others look like ghost towns, places rarely visited, and not welcoming to the casual passerby. How did all these blogs end up abandoned, dusty and neglected? We can’t know for sure since we weren’t there. But I know the thing that makes or breaks your blog, if you’re an author trying to attract a community of readers: reader engagement." The Book Designer | @JFbookman

IT'S THE CONTENT, STUPID! (AND THE COMMUNITY.)

"While Wall Street and technology pundits continue to devalue those who create and curate content professionally in favor of dumb pipes, content aggregators, and social media pyramid schemes, the fact is, at the end of the day, it all starts with good content. The digital business is a cork floating on the publishing stream, and without quality content, the new shiny platforms are little more than virtual bricks sinking to the bottom at varying rates of speed. Perhaps it’s time to start treating authors and publishers with a bit more respect, as collaborators rather than chumps, partners rather than prey?" Guy LeCharles Gonzalez | @glecharles

THE "NEW AUTHOR PLATFORM" - WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

"It’s still about visibility, but today’s approach has changed. The New Author Platform requires a focus on developing an unobstructed back and forth between authors and their readers, with the authors — not the publishers — controlling the flow. Now it’s the author, not a publicist, who inspires readers to buy the book. The New Author Platform allows not only well-established authors, but unknown, first-time beginners to do an end run around the conservative gate-keepers and reach readers directly." Alan Rinzler

PUBLISHING IS LIVING IN A WORLD NOT OF ITS OWN MAKING

"I have been guilty of a publishing-centric view of the possibility that Apple would enforce the rule that leads to this change since it was first prominently rumored last February. That is: with wishful thinking, when I first heard about this possibility six months ago I thought they wouldn’t do it. I talked myself into believing that because Apple had benefited substantially from the presence of the book apps on their platform, and because there are millions of us who read ebooks on our Apple devices with a distinct preference for using other readers and other ebook stores, that Apple would not enforce the rules which, through a couple of iterations of clarification, say that the way these apps and stores operated was outside their rules." The Shatzkin Files | @MikeShatzkin

WHY BAD REVIEWS ROCK

"There’s even some robust empirical support for the idea that bad reviews sell. Here’s a study of New York Times book reviews reported in Marketing Science that was conducted using Nielsen Bookscan data. The upshot is that negative reviews of works by authors who had previously published fewer than two books boosted their sales by 45% on average. Negative reviews of well-known authors (i.e. those who had published 10 or more books previously) hurt their sales by 15%. So the advice about linking to your one-star reviews doesn’t apply after you’ve published your tenth book." Mike Mullin

WHAT'S A BOOK? IT'S WHATEVER YOU WANT IT TO BE

"This kind of “format shifting,” in which a newspaper or magazine takes content that has already been published and reformats it for the Kindle or some other device, makes a lot of sense. That content can theoretically reach readers who might never have picked up the newspaper or magazine, or who missed it when it was first printed, or who want to read it in book form while sitting on their couch or at the beach rather than on a computer. And if the cost is low enough, they will be willing to pay for that convenience." Giga Om | @mathewi

WHAT IF PIRACY DOES SELL MORE CONTENT?

"This is not necessarily universally true, of course, and undoubtedly people can bring up a number of counter-examples where piracy harms someone’s market instead of helping it. But the point is, whenever piracy is brought up, a lot of people react as if it weren’t true at all, and any case of someone getting their content for free is not only taking the bread out of their mouths but an affront to their moral dignity. But what if piracy actually is helping them sell more books? It’s sort of a glass-half-full versus glass-half-empty kind of thing. In the 100 vs. 1,000 + 9,000 example above, some people would be inclined to say, “Hey, great, I sold 1,000 copies instead of 100!” But others would only be able to see the 9,000 they weren’t paid for." TeleRead

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