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The 'Cloud Reader' Effect

10 Aug 2011 in international | questo post è lungo 621 parole

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AMAZON VS. APPLE: ROUND 3: THE CLOUD READER LAUNCHES

Cloud Reader With the release of their Cloud Reader browser app for Kindle, Amazon has become the first of the major booksellers to respond to Apple's recent enforcement of its rules on in-app purchase with an attractive browser-based alternative. With the ability to read offline, and to add a homescreen shortcut, this seems on first impressions to offer a very slick user experience, definitely comparable to the native app. More importantly, so far as Amazon is concerned, it also reinstates the link to the Kindle store that was recently removed from the Kindle iOS app in order to conform to Apple's rules on in-app purchase. FutureBook | @TheFutureBook

AMAZON SHAKES OFF APPLE’S SHACKLES WITH ITS KINDLE CLOUD READER APP

The Kindle Cloud Reader potentially gives Amazon a far greater degree of control over the app, and plays to the company’s other big strand of business around centralized, cloud-based services. It also gives a hint of how Amazon might deliver its Kindle services over a much-rumored Amazon tablet. PaidContent

HERE'S HOW AMAZON'S CLOUD READER APP FOR IPAD IS BEATING APPLE AT ITS OWN GAME

It feels like today is a good day to be a web app developer. In addition to Vudu's HTML 5-powered video service, Amazon released it's own web app that lets you access all your Kindle books. Both apps circumvent Apple's in-app purchase rules, and ensure all revenue goes directly to the content providers. Apple doesn't get its 30% cut. And both apps are actually pretty good. With Kindle's Cloud Reader, you can sync your entire library just as you can on your Kindle reader or any its other smartphone and tablet apps. You can even "pin" books for reading offline. Business Insider

AMAZON KINDLE CLOUD READER BEATS APPLE RESTRICTIONS

There are a zillion articles on this quietly released feature already. Electricpig’s points out immediately that "Amazon has quietly outed a way to get round Apple’s restrictions on iOS in-app purchases: the Amazon Kindle Cloud Reader. We thought Amazon had simply acquiesced to Apple when it killed the store link in its Kindle iPhone and iPad apps but it had a Plan B in the works. The Kindle Cloud Reader is a totally web-based version of the eBook reader app that works with Chrome and Safari and comes optimised for the iPad. The iPhone isn’t supported yet but that can only be a matter of time." Teleread, via [Andrys Basten’s A Kindle World Blog](http://kindleworld.blogspot.com/2011/08/amazon-was-ready-for-apples-no-buy-here.html?utmsource=feedburner&utmmedium=feed&utmcampaign=Feed%3A+AKindleWorld+%28A+Kindle+World+blog%29&utmcontent=Google+Reader)

AMAZON'S CLOUD READER: BEGINNING OF THE HTML5 SURGE VS. APPLE'S APP STORE VIG

Amazon kicks off the end run around Apple’s in-app purchase restrictions with a snazzy HTML5 app that will likely be emulated by other publishers. The challenge Amazon—and anyone going the HTML5 route—will be user behavior. Will users go with a browser based version over an app? As wireless service speeds increase via 4G it’s likely that the browser wins the day. That transition may take years to play out, but HTML5 will wind up winning the day. ZdNet

HANDS ON: KINDLE CLOUD READER

The Kindle Cloud Reader is a fine, useful way to read your Amazon ebooks on your tablet or desktop PC. It will be interesting to see how users react to the Kindle Cloud Reader -- and perhaps more interesting to see how Apple reacts. Amazon has a large user base for its Kindle ebooks, and giving iPad owners the ability to download and read those books is a direct challenge to Apple's iBooks app. Will Apply simple count on the quality of its iBooks app (and the selection from its iBookstore) to counter Amazon's services? Time will tell. Computerworld

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