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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (August, 12)

12 Aug 2011 in international | questo post è lungo 736 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter_ to get frequent updates. [Previous]._

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THE END OF PAPER BOOKS

_My interview of Tim O’Reilly for the Harvard Library Innovation Lab podcast series is up. Tim begins by arguing that paper books will go away before our culture is entirely ready for it because the disappearance will be driven by the publishers, not by demand. Good point. David Weinberger _

SELF-PUBLISHING IN A POST-PAPER WORLD

Stackpole talkMichael Stackpole was discussing the benefits of Amazon to writers’ cash flow—Amazon pays 70% royalties (on e-books of $2.99 and up) and pays them every month, unlike publishers who pay a lower percentage and less frequently. Stackpole also noted that there are diminishing returns involved in trying to make sure your e-book is available on every platform. Between them, Kindle and Barnes & Noble have over 85% of the market; the time and effort involved in chasing the other 15% could be better spent writing more instead. Teleread

DAVID GAUGHRAN SEPARATES MYTH AND REALITY ABOUT INDIE-PUBLISHING

Bookstores are dying. That might sound callous, but it’s a fact. People are moving online, either because of reduced prices and greater selection, or because the recent spate of bookstore closures and chain collapses have left them without a physical place they can buy books other than the box-stores like Wal-Mart or Tesco which only stock the bestsellers anyway. Amazon is on its way to controlling 50% of the overall US book market in 2012. Each week that one clear advantage of going with a large publisher is worth less and less, and at the kind of advance most writers will get, you won’t even get to exploit it. These are the facts. But Big Publishing doesn’t want to engage in that argument. Mark Williams

WHAT ARE THE DEEPER IMPLICATIONS OF THE SHIFT TO EBOOK - FOR US

In a way, no one knows what will happen. Everyone is waiting for an opportunity to seize an advantage and take over the profits in books and everyone is uncertain of the direction in which things will move. This might be the best of times for books. This might be the worst of times for books. It might even be both - In fact, it probably is both. iReaderReview.com

FROM SELF-PUBLISHING TO METAPUBLISHING: A FAREWELL FROM SCOTT NICHOLSON

I like to say that the traditional press is currently struggling to go from A to B while Amazon is at D and figuring out what E and F look like. Most indie authors are already at C. Tradition is losing to an era that is inventing itself by the minute. IndieRedaer

AM I STILL DIGGING PUBLISHING?

So let's review: E-books = the wild, wild West. The e-reader has made us all prospectors in one way or another -- whether you're a plain ol' consumer looking for a romance to make you swoon or a thriller to set you at the edge of your seat; whether you're a writer seeking fame and fortune, or a publisher looking to expand your audience and provide them a more convenient and innovative reading experience. Either way, there be gold in them thar hills. Huffington Post

WHY WE LOVE SUSPENDING OUR DISBELIEF

Suspending your disbelief can make stories smarter and more interesting Obviously, this isn't always true — a lot of very dumb movies, like the Transformersfilms, require a fair amount of suspension of disbelief from audiences. But even when your amazing powers of acceptance are deployed in support of a story that's pulpy and silly, about a giant robot fighting a butterfly from outer space or whatever, most of us would still agree that the result is "more interesting" on its face than a story about a businessman who questions whether the rat race is for him. io9 via SFSignal

SUSAN MEYER SHARES PLOT SECRETS

Your book should begin with an inciting incident (sometimes called Terrible Trouble) – an action that sets off a chain of events. In a category romance the hero and heroine would also meet at that point. i.e. The hero hires the heroine to be the nanny for his daughter. Inciting incident is the hiring. That will set off a chain of events. But…the hero and heroine are also meeting. AND as the author you’re being given a chance to introduce these two people to your readers. Annawrites.com

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