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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (August, 22)

22 Aug 2011 in international | questo post è lungo 696 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter_ to get frequent updates. [Previous]._

END OF THE BOOKS DEBATE: ‘SHORT LIVES IN THE LONG TAIL’

The end of books debate The end of Books? Are books nearing their end? Yes, absolutely, within twenty five years the digital revolution will bring about the end of paper books. But more importantly, ebooks and epublishing will mean the end of ‘writer’ as a profession. Ebooks in the future will be written by first timers, by teams, by speciality subject enthusiasts and by those who were already established in the era of the paper book. The digital revolution will not emancipate writers, or open up a new era of creativity, it will mean that writers offer up their work for next to nothing or for free. Writing, as a profession, will cease to exist. David Petherick

AMAZON PUBLISHING: FOR THE REST OF THE BOOK INDUSTRY, IT'S A CAUSE FOR A BAD CASE OF NERVES

For Amazon, a publishing program is the next logical step in its long-term business strategy. For the rest of the book industry, it’s cause for a bad case of nerves. Amazon’s announcement this past week that it would be publishing its first major title—The 4-Hour Chef, by self-help maven Tim Ferriss—had the chief executive of HarperCollins UK worrying aloud in the New York Times: “[Amazon is] very, very powerful now, and in fact they are getting close to being in a monopolistic situation.” Austin Allen

THE ART OF SELLING BOOKS WHILE UNDER SIEGE FROM THE WEB AND ECONOMY

Independent bookstores have had a long-running battle against gathering forces that seem determined to wipe out neighborhood shops. From the expansion of big-box stores in the 1990s to the current e-book craze, selling books in the past 20 years has become a competitive sport. Book sales in the U.S. peaked at $16.8 billion in 2005 and totaled $16.5 billion last year, said Peter Wahlstrom, an analyst at Morningstar Investment Services, citing U.S. census data. Books were still a $23.9 billion-a-year industry in 2009, including textbooks and e-books, he said. Booksellers are looking for an edge as the dual challenges of a bad economy and a changing industry make owning a bookstore a treacherous affair. From selling e-books to tweaking business models to hitting the road for more than half a year in search of inventory, local bookstore owners are pulling out all the stops to stay afloat. Luis Llovio

THIS IS WHY WE LOVE THE SELF-PUBLISHING MOVEMENT. AUTHORS ARE SHARING DATA AND EXPERIENCE

I’m not (yet) a Kindle millionaire but sales of Pentecost have now gone over the 10,000 mark which for me is significant, so I am sharing the figures and also what they mean for the next in the series, Prophecy. Hopefully you will find this interesting as it changes my personal publishing strategy considerably. Joanna Penn | @thecreativepenn

A NICE BREACKDOWN OF EBOOK PRICES

The majority of average readers/consumers with a Kindle, purchasing from Amazon.com are choosing from three basic price point categories: A.  A free eBook (29%) B.  A $0.99 eBook (26%) C.  A Best-selling author’s eBook priced at $12.99, $7.99, or $9.99 (26%) Those three categories account for 81% of the Top 100 Bestselling Thrillers, as of today. Now, I’ve been a devotee of Dean Wesley Smith and I do agree with his arguments regarding the reasonable price points of full length novels. The last time I checked Sensei Dean was making a rational argument for $4.99 full-length novels. On the other hand, authors like Joe Konrath, John Locke and Scott Nicholson like the $2.99 to $0.99 price points. Nicholson even has at least one of his novels priced at $0.00. The Passive Voice | @passivevoiceblg via @lkblackburne

HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING AND LOVE THE EBOOK

The assumption is that traditional publishing is the real deal and self-publishing is for writers who couldn’t make it any other way. But I’m not a big fan of assumptions. I like to examine things more closely and from different perspectives. So let’s take a closer look at how traditional publishing stacks up against indie publishing today. Shevi Arnold

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