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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (September, 6)

06 Sep 2011 in international | questo post è lungo 656 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter_ to get frequent updates. [Previous]._

FROM SCROLL TO SCREEN

Something very important and very weird is happening to the book right now: It’s shedding its papery corpus and transmigrating into a bodiless digital form, right before our eyes. We’re witnessing the bibliographical equivalent of the rapture. If anything we may be lowballing the weirdness of it all. The last time a change of this magnitude occurred was circa 1450, when Johannes Gutenberg invented movable type. Lev Grossman

TEN THINGS I'VE LEARNED OVER 12 YEARS OF SENDING OUT STORIES

1. Mark Farrington, my first writing teacher at the Johns Hopkins MA Program in Writing in the fall of 1998, suggested we should start sending our stories out “when they are as good as we can make them.” That may seem obvious, but I’ve found it to be a great rule of thumb. Perhaps you’ve had several rounds of feedback, you’ve revised, and while you still see problems, you don’t know how to fix them. When you’ve taken a story as far as you can on your own, send it out. 2. Send stories out broadly – ten to twenty journals at a time Josh Rolnick

WHY WE'RE DRM-FREE (AND IT'S NOT BECAUSE WE TRUST YOU...)

So our online bookstore has finally gone live. Buy early and buy often: our author contracts provide for the author to get paid every month on direct sales, rather than every six months as is the industry norm, so purchases from our store help writers! However the main thrust of this post is not to prod publishers toward that model (though it would be nice of they did) but to prod farther towards DRM-free. Why? [...] The deep reason we do it is that we want you to forward the ePub to someone you think will really like it. Richard Nash

AMAZON CONTINUES ON ITS MISSION TO DISINTERMEDIATE PUBLISHERS

But connecting authors directly with readers isn’t the only way Amazon wants to disintermediate publishers. The online retailer has also taken a more direct step recently by signing a deal to publish Ferriss, whose books have become phenomenally popular over the past year. Although Amazon has published other authors, the Ferriss deal got the attention of many in the publishing world as a kind of shot across the bow of traditional publishers — many of whom are still smarting from their recent battles with Amazon over book pricing. Matthew Ingram

MASS-MARKET PAPERBACKS SALES IN DECLINE

These are dark and stormy times for the mass-market paperback, that squat little book that calls to mind the beach and airport newsstands. Recession-minded readers who might have picked up a quick novel in the supermarket or drugstore are lately resisting the impulse purchase. Shelf space in bookstores and retail chains has been turned over to more expensive editions, like hardcovers and trade paperbacks, the sleeker, more glamorous cousin to the mass-market paperback. And while mass-market paperbacks have always been prized for their cheapness and disposability, something even more convenient has come along: the e-book. Julie Bosman

EBOOKS' POPULARITY IS REWRITING THE SALES STORY

The numbers tell the story: •Random House, the USA's largest publisher, says more than 20% of U.S. revenue in the first half of this year were from digital sales. •Amazon recently announced that two more authors,Kathryn Stockett and Janet Evanovich, have reached the million mark in Kindle e-book sales. •Eight of the top 20 titles on USA TODAY's Best-Selling Books list this week are e-books. Carol Memmott

CAN TERRIBLE COVERS KILL SALES OF A GOOD BOOK?

As you design your own electronic books, you’ll need to create some cover art. Many established authors discuss professional publishers as if their art departments are a godsend, and they can be. However, I’ve seen so much damage done to potential sales through poor cover art that I have to admit that I’m a bit leery of trusting the publishers. Passive Voice

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