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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (September, 30)

30 Sep 2011 in international | questo post è lungo 761 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter to get frequent updates. [Previous].

SPARKING EBOOK SALES WITH FIRE?

"The Fire does not support EPUB or EPUB 3, so a separate .mobi production stream will still be required, especially to produce more complex and interactive Amazon eBooks with features of the type allowed by the EPUB 3 format. One unanswered question is whether the Fire tablet will be able to access books currently being sold as “Kindle Editions with Audio/Video”.  Currently only the Kindle for iPad/iPhone app is able to read these files and a quick check of the web site doesn’t give any indication that the Fire can. This new tablet, if so enabled, could be a unique opportunity for Amazon to support enhanced titles, opening an array of new possibilities within the Amazon eBook ecosystem." Digital Book World

AMAZON KINDLE THE FIRE. EBOOKS GO MAINSTREAM.

"I’m sure there will be the usual lamentation that this attitude will flood the market with more self-published books of bad quality, but I trust the market. I am a heavy Kindle user. I am the market. I always download a sample unless I trust the author. I always delete the sample and don’t buy if the formatting is bad or if the book is not enjoyable or useful. I only buy books that pass this sample test. I go by reader recommendations and how many stars there are. I buy based on recommendations from my friends on twitter. Crap books with crap covers do not sell. They don’t rank on the bestseller list. They do not get recommendations." The Creative Penn | @thecreativepenn

AMAZON'S KINDLE FIRE: WILL IT STOKE ENTHUSIASM FOR E-READING?

"Being in close contact with both readers and authors I've witnessed a genuine increase in recreational reading since the Kindle arrived in the UK. In the words of one of our members: "Since I've had my Kindle I have read 63 books, which may not sound much to others, but considering I only read in single figures for the whole of last year that is a major jump."" The Guardian

AMAZON'S GRIP TIGHTENS ON THE ENTIRE BOOK-PUBLISHING CHAIN

"As more customers adopt Kindles, iPads and other devices that make e-books more attractive, the print-to-digital shift will start snowballing. By expanding its own publishing arm, Amazon accelerates the rate at which traditional publishers could find themselves entirely cut out of the supply chain." CNNMoney | @CNNMoneyTech

THE FUTURE OF BOOKS: A DYSTOPIAN TIMELINE

"2016 – Lifestyle magazines as well as most popular Conde Nast titles will go tablet-only. 2018 – The last Barnes & Noble store converts to a cafe and digital access point. 2019 – B&N and Amazon’s publishing arms – including self-pub – will dwarf all other publishing. 2019 – The great culling of the publishers. Smaller houses may survive but not many of them. The giants like Random House and Penguin will calve their smaller houses into e-only ventures. The last of the “publisher subsidized” tablet devices will falter." TechCrunch | @johnbiggs

THE PERFECT STORM IS LOOMING IN PUBLISHING

"If I had to point to the #1 problem in epublishing it’s this lack of vision of the big picture. Not just that, but there are actually people in the system whose jobs are threatened by the new business model and are fighting it inside their own organizations whether overtly or covertly." Bob Mayer's Blog | @bob_mayer

ARE WRITERS HARMING THEMSELVES BY STICKING WITH TRADITIONAL PUBLISHERS?

"But more and more, it seems like something is going to have to happen to traditional publishers over the next few years as the self-publishing pressure builds up. They’ll have to change something to stay alive. The question is what? It’s easy for people like me to say publishers should ditch the massive inefficiencies that have built up over time, wherein they print many more copies of a book than they know they will sell and pay for taking back and pulping the extras. But publishers may well be as much prisoners as perpetrators of that system, as the already-emperiled distributors and bookstores might stop ordering their books altogether without the guarantee that the publisher would eat the cost of any that didn’t sell. It might very well take the much-prophesied “death of the bookstore” for publishers to break free." TeleRead | @robotech_master

BONUS

Am I Selling Books Just Because My Books are Cheap? | @samatlounge

Four years into the ebook revolution: things we know and things we don’t know | @MikeShatzkin

What Is a Story? | Philip Martin

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