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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (October, 5)

05 Oct 2011 in international | questo post è lungo 663 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter to get frequent updates. [Previous].

THE NEW VALUE OF TEXT

"We are witnessing a profound assault on book publishing and literature, on the text itself—not from ebooks, which publishers are slowly, painfully coming around to after a long resistance, or the internet, which is after all entirely made of text—but from applications, “enhanced” books and reductive notions of literary experience. As I’ve written about before, in the context of advertising, publishers’ reactions to new technologies betray a profound lack of confidence in the text itself. We are being distracted by shiny things." Booktwo.org | @jamesbridle

AMAZON KNOWS THE MEDIUM DOESN'T MATTER

"Yes, Amazon will continue to sell books from top publishers. But if it can look at its mountains of data and determine that there's an opportunity to serve a certain segment of its best customers with a certain type of book then it makes all the sense in the world for Amazon to become the publisher of the book, whether physical or digital. This is exactly what other publishers are trying to do-learn from actual readers what they want so the publisher can make more informed acquisition and publication decisions. Amazon just happens to be closer to the customer than any publisher, so it is in a better position to lead out in a customer-focused publishing world." EContent

CONTENT IS A SOCIAL CREATURE

"Reading and writing have always been social. Authors read the work of others and discuss their ideas with colleagues; readers talk to each other about what they've read. But the reification of ideas into mass-printed objects has obscured the social aspect, which doesn't "appear" to be part of the book itself." O'Reilly Radar | @JennWebb

ENHANCED E-BOOKS AND THE FUTURE OF PUBLISHING

"Until now, enhanced e-books have really been the domain of iPads. But with Amazon's announcement last week of the Kindle Fire, a seven-inch touchscreen tablet at a price that is substantially less than half the iPad, the competition between these major companies will quickly add millions of consumers to the potential audience and drive the pricing for devices and the content on them in the months ahead, particularly as we head into the holiday season. Assuming that forthcoming enhanced e-books are comparable in quality to the best of those already in circulation, they will add a major new element to the digital market, which has already surged by over 150 percent in the past year." The Atlantic

WHO'S NEXT?

"This is the moment when traditional publishing and bookselling has a chance to affect the shape of the outcome. We cannot afford to wait until the dust clears. The market may not have much room for us then. So please, let's start swimming with the digital sharks." FutureBook | @Harkaway

THE FUTURE OF READING: IPAD, KINDLE... AND HARDBACK

"If this is the valley of destruction, then many publishers can begin to glimpse distant sunlit uplands. People haven't stopped reading fiction or non-fiction, or paying for what they read. On the contrary, via both Kindle and printed page, they're reading as much as ever. The book isn't dead. The novel isn't dead, either. Ebooks, devoid of printing costs, represent real and potential growth – with costs far more under control. And maybe mass paperback stores face a dreadful time, but neighbourhood booksellers are gradually growing more confident." The Observer

WERE E-BOOKS RESPONSIBLE FOR KILLING BORDERS?

"E-books may not be a direct cause of bookstore death, but I think they’re a sort of test for bookstores that it is possible to get wrong. Getting the answer wrong, or at least not right enough, may not be enough to doom the store by itself, but if it’s part of an overall pattern of poor decision-making, it’s definitely going to help that process along. And conversely, getting the answer right or mostly right may not be enough to save Barnes & Noble in the end." TeleRead | @robotech_master

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