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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (October, 11)

11 Oct 2011 in international | questo post è lungo 907 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter to get frequent updates. [Previous].

DIGITAL READING: AT THE INTERSECTION OF READING AND RETAIL

"Sometimes your point of view depends on where you’re standing. Publishers and booksellers focus on price points, bestseller lists and reorders to figure out what their customers want. Those on the editorial side of the equation look to customer reviews, direct feedback (when they can get it) and author-and-genre loyalty among buyers for insight into their readers’ preferences. As Editorial Director for Digital Content at Barnes & Noble, Liz Scheier sees both sides of the digital publishing equation, with an unobstructed, front-row view of what readers want and how publishers and retailers can give it to them." Digital Book World@bklynanne

EBOOKS DON'T SPELL THE END OF LITERATURE

"I don't believe this technology will destroy the printed object; real books will never lose their charm. But Luddites who see today's new ways of reading as an assault are fantasising. Literacy has been under attack for decades, from all directions. Reading suffered its worst assault, perhaps, from television. My nain (my Welsh grandmother) used to read all the time – in fact she was the village librarian – but you wouldn't find many people in that same village today with the TV off, their heads in books. It is therefore surely arguable that e-readers are not the destroyers but the saviours of the book. A generation may return to the written word because of this technology." Jonathan Jones on art

SALES PER BOOK

"And when everyone is rushing to increase supply along the long tail, it doesn’t matter if a publisher decides to hold back and publish fewer titles–the public doesn’t know who publishes what and doesn’t really care. The end result, I predict, is that sales per book published are going to decrease as much as 20% next year. Sure, there are plenty of hits left to happen, and the short head of the bestseller list is going to be a good place to be for a while to come. But the midlist (which means most books) is going to see sales per book go down. And keep going down. Good for people who like to discover interesting ideas. Bad for people who publish them the traditional way." The Domino Project

WILL PUBLISHERS BE ABLE TO MANTAIN PRIMACY AS EBOOK PUBLISHERS?

"This is not a surprise to me, but it does really raise a point that major publishers have to consider: can book publishers add enough value to the ebook publishing process to persuade another brand with content credibility, one that has direct contact with the vertical community that is the audience for their books, to do their ebooks through the publisher rather than directly? This is an existential question for big trade publishers. They have forged partnerships with other brands, even media brands, for many years based on their unique ability to deliver printed books competently and to put them on bookstore shelves. Those are things that a magazine, a broadcast network, a movie studio, or a packaged goods company couldn’t do for themselves." The Shatzkin Files | @MikeShatzkin

SOCIAL COMMERCE AND MULTI-CHANNEL PUBLISHING

"The opportunity Social Commerce presents to publishers is significant. The ability to sell direct to readers effectively and in a targeted fashion, without the need to build a single retail brand or the paraphernalia that goes with it, will bring a plethora of benefits. This is a channel that is made even more effective with the growth of eBooks, offering instant, direct sales with no stock holding. The trick is how to make the most of this channel, starting by taking a few pointers from retail. There is no "one-size fits all" approach to this, but there are certain truisms that have become apparent over the last decade or so." FutureBook

PUBLISHING INDUSTRY NEED TO START THINKING OF THE CONSUMER FIRST

"The largest hurdle in the transition is the mindset. Publishing is one of the oldest industries around and now has to deal with a transition from analog to digital at a speed that is at least twice as fast as the music industry faced. What I see around me in the Netherlands — and I don't know if this is or was the same in the US — is that the publishers don't want to learn from the mistakes made by the music industry, and they make every mistake all over again: DRM, high pricing, not enough titles available, technical difficulties due to the different readers and types of ebooks, etc. If they would just see that the world is changing rapidly, that digital will be bigger than analog soon, and that change is a must, it would help us all — including consumers."" O'Reilly Radar@boezeman

AMAZON TO BOOK PUBLISHERS: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE, BABY

"What publishers need to realize is that authors like Eisler and Ferriss — and even some without that kind of pre-existing fame — don’t have to put up with the glacier-like pace and other downsides of the mainstream publishing business any more. If a publishing deal is lucrative enough they might take it, but even if it is lucrative, they might decide to simply cut their own deal, and Amazon is more than happy to step in. In that sense, the Eisler deal is yet another wake-up call for the industry: Adapt or die." Gigaom | @mathewi

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