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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (November, 4)

04 Nov 2011 in international | questo post è lungo 1108 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter to get frequent updates. [Previous].

BOOK AS PROCESS, BOOK AS BYPRODUCT, BOOK AS CONVERSATION

"Start with Kevin Kelly’s 2006 essay in The New York Times Magazine arguing that authors would come to support themselves with performance — and John Updike’s appalled reaction to this “pretty grisly scenario.” I’m not suggesting that authors become merely actors after their books are done. I’m suggesting, as Garber does, that talks, events, symposia, blogs, hangouts… — discussion with smart people in any form — should come before the book. The process becomes the product; the book (if there is one) is a byproduct." BuzzMachine | @jeffjarvis

GRISHAM TALKS AMBULANCE CHASERS, EBOOKS

"The emergence of eBooks is phenomenal. A year ago, my last book, "The Confession" was published. It was the first time we released the digital version of the book the same day as the hardback. After one year, my total sales are 40% digital and 60% hardback and the numbers have gone up. That's obviously good news for me because more people are reading the books. The question is -- and no one can answer it -- is where are we going to be in five years? Five years ago no one saw this coming. Maybe Jeff Bezos at Amazon did, because that guy can see around corners. I think he's the smartest guy in publishing today, but it's changing all the time and no one really knows where it's going." CNN | Christian DuChateau

KOBO TO BECOME A PUBLISHER

"Like Amazon, which announced two weeks ago that it would be publishing 122 original titles this fall, Kobo will be offering complete publishing services for authors, including book editing and design. "It's part of the new market and if you expect to be a number 1 player in that market globally it's table stakes — you have to provide it," Serbinis told CBC News."" CBC News

THE FUTURE IS INDIE

"The problem for large publishers, however, is that they are transitioning from a marketplace where they controlled distribution to one where they don’t. The digital playing field is wide open and, for the first time, the publishing conglomerates are facing real competition from a horde of hungry self-publishers, savvy small publishers, as well as, of course, Amazon. This isn’t just supposition. The monthly AAP stats show e-books booming and print collapsing in 2011. One thing is clear: the rise in e-book revenue is not sufficient to offset the losses in print – at least for the publishers measured by those surveys." Indie Reader | @DavidGaughran

ANOTHER PERSPECTIVE ON AMAZON AS PUBLISHER & BOOKSELLER, PLUS A CONTRARIAN VIEW ON DISRUPTION IN PUBLISHING

"So, while Amazon plays a close second-fiddle in the overall book market to Barnes & Noble, it has the overwhelming advantage in growing e-book market. This accrues significant market advantages to Amazon – and these are advantages that B&N has to struggle to counteract. Because of this, Amazon is able to act in ways that are similar to or approaching the practices of a monopolist, and this gives rise to many of the questionable business practices Amazon has engaged in. I’ll pause here to note, however, that being a monopoly – or a part of an oligopoly, for that matter – is not a moral question. There’s nothing inherently wrong with having a monopoly. If you have a superior product, it’s natural that you’ll gain a significant advantage in the marketplace. Having a monopoly is merely a description of the realities of a market. The problem arises from behavior." The Undiscovered Author

THE PERFECT BOOKSTORE

"The place reminded me of how bookselling should be (and used to be like): not stacking discounted items high in a race to the bottom of the industry. Instead, books were displayed everywhere according to what staff wanted or recommended rather than some central list. That made for a lot of fascinating browsing. There were loads of friendly booksellers on hand, too. The entire building seemed like a book haven, with a strong community feel: something buying online or ebooks can’t provide. You can just tell when a bookstore is loved by people – because it’s full of customers even in the middle of the week." Mark Charan Newton | @MarkCN

A NEW CHAPTER FOR E-BOOKS

"Rowling's effort points the way toward a social, deeply interconnected, digital experience of reading a book—a book that is designed to change over time. Not all authors will have the resources and readership to produce a project like Pottermore. Nonetheless, the website presages a new kind of reading experience, one that takes greater advantage of the electronic aspect of e-books. There's much to be dissatisfied with in today's typical experience of e-books. They lack the sensual attributes of books—including the paper quality that signals the difference between an elegant literary edition and a cheap, pulpy paperback. But I'm not just lamenting the vanishing joys of print. As a vision for the future, today's e-books are far too conservative—they miss many opportunities." Technology Review | @EricaNaone

CORY DOCTOROW: IT'S TIME TO STOP TALKING ABOUT COPYRIGHT

"I inaugurated this column in 2008 with an editorial called ‘‘Why I Copyfight’’, which talked about the tricky balance between creativity, culture, and the relationship between audiences and creators. These have always been hard subjects, and the Internet has made them harder still, because the thing that triggers copyright rules – copying – is an intrinsic part of the functioning of the Internet and computers. There’s really no such thing as ‘‘loading’’ a web-page – you make a copy of it. There’s really no such thing as ‘‘reading’’ a file off a hard-drive – you copy it into memory." Locus Online Perspectives |@doctorow

DIGITAL READERS, AN ESSAY BY KATHRYN POPE

"This is because the magic of reading isn’t necessarily in the smell of the pages, and it’s not in the size and shape of the paperback. There’s nothing special in book binding glue. The magic comes in the way that we become absorbed in the stories and ideas of others. The magic is in the suspension of our disbelief, the beauty or cacophony of words, the way we move from our physical world to another when we enter a book. It’s in what David Lodge talks about when one of his characters suggests that the novel is the closest thing to telepathy that we can get. The book happens with the words, not the object—plus, if books are sacred as objects, rather than vehicles for the words inside, we’re already doing a bad job of treating them that way." TeleRead

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