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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (December, 4)

04 Dec 2011 in international | questo post è lungo 856 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter to get frequent updates. [Previous].

THE EROSION IN THE PAID MEDIA PYRAMID

"A. Almost anyone can now publish almost anything. You can publish a book without a publisher, record a song without a label, host a seminar without a seminar company, sell your art without a gallery. This leads to an explosion of choice. (Or from the point of view of the media producer, an explosion of clutter and competition). B. Because of A, attention is worth more than ever before. The single gating factor for almost all success in media is, "do people know enough about it to choose to buy something?"" Seth's Blog

ONE PUBLISHING EXPERIMENT ENDS, ANOTHER BEGINS

"The ebook is a change agent like none the book business has ever seen. It cuts the publishing time cycle by 90%, lowers costs, lowers revenue and creates both a long tail and an impulse-buying opportunity. This is the most disruptive thing to happen to books in four hundred years. It's hard for me to see significant ways traditional book publishers can add the value they're used to adding when it comes to marketing ebooks, unless they get busy with #1 ..." O'Reilly Radar | @JennWebb

WHAT WE SHOULD LEARN FROM THE COLLAPSE OF BORDERS

"But the lesson of Borders is not about the advent of new businesses and threats; nor is it about the many mistakes made by the Borders management, so many that you can only shake your head in wonder. (The saga of Borders is beautifully chronicled in Business Week.) The real thing to take from Borders’ collapse is that the old infrastructure will not always be there. In one stroke trade publishers lost a huge chunk of their distribution network. That network was not simply sitting around patiently, waiting for publishers to get their digital game plan ready." The Scholarly Kitchen | @JosephJEsposito

REASONS NOT TO SELF-PUBLISH IN 2011-2012: A LIST

"In a previous essay, I interviewed four self-published authors I admire, and I examined some of the benefits of that career path. Midway through writing the piece, I realized I’d have to continue the discussion in a second essay in order to fully explore my feelings (complicated) on the topic (multifaceted). You see, Reader, I still don’t plan on self-publishing my first novel, though I don’t deny the positive aspects of that choice. Below I’ve outlined a few reasons behind my decision, informed by our contemporary moment. I can’t predict the future, though I’m sure I’ll remain comfortable with my opinions for at least another thirteen months. It’s in a list format, the pet genre of the blogosphere. How else was I to keep my head from imploding?" The Millions | @EdanL

THE PAPERLESS BOOK

"I have been hesitant to call "Every Book Is A Startup" a book because of the expectations people hold for a book: a finished work, written from a position of singular authority, available in some way in a physical form. What I never expected was how strongly the qualities of a book would be brought forward from the physical to the digital. Digital books have been designed to carry forward the same atomic quality of immutability of physical books. As I reached out to my colleagues working in the world of ebooks, the consensus was that no one had considered a reality where an author, given the ability to distribute directly and virtually cost free, would consider updating their work and the consequences that might have. Bits and atoms don't behave the same way, but we have built the next step forward in publishing as though they do." O'Reilly Radar | @toddsattersten

QUALITY IS THE NEW GATEKEEPER: HOW EBOOKS HAVE CHANGED MY READING

"I was thinking today about how ebooks have changed my reading habits in the last few years. I had flirted with them as early as 2005, when I experimented with Project Gutenberg freebies on a Palm Pilot while living in smalltown New Zealand. There was only one local bookstore, and its selection was lacking. At the time, Project Gutenberg was a revelation. In the years since, I have gone through 5 main readers and nearly as many preferred bookstores, and spent over $500 a year on books and content. So, how has my reading changed?" Teleread

THE INDIE BOOKSTORE IN THE AMAZON AGE

"Yet indie bookstores can and should fight back. Although books are entertainment — few people would call a Glenn Beck or Rush Limbaugh book an educational bromide — they are also the source of knowledge and we continue to need help in picking through the detritus for the gem. I have been thinking about what indie bookstores can do to fight back. I’m not sure they can ever compete on price unless book publishers, especially the Agency 6, are willing to give special help, but there are things that they can do." An American Editor

BONUS @MikeShatzkin | The ebook value chain is still sorting itself out, and so are the splits » Read @SarahM | How Twitter helps a small bookstore thrive » Read

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