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The 99-Cent Debate

31 Dec 2011 in international | questo post è lungo 848 parole

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THE 99-CENT PROBLEM

"«Readers may buy you once for 99 cents, but if they are disappointed they will never buy you again or even download you for free. On the other hand a reader will pay $4.99, $5.99 even up to $12 for an ebook of a writer whose work speaks to her. I'm seeing way too much conversation about what to charge for the book instead of how to write the book ... Quality matters more than ever.»" O'Reilly Radar | @JennWebb

THOUGHTS ON THE 99 CENT PRICING DEBATE

"It worries me that we are letting the wrong motives control pricing. The music industry did that while fighting Napster and resisting ITunes and lost the battle. If we are more reasonable from the start but yet all work together to set fair prices, not greedy ones but fair ones, we will all be better off in the long run. And in the long run, we won’t lose sales. The market won’t go away. Trust me. If all people could find at $.99 was books of a lower quality or a few on special sales, they would jump to buy our $4.99 novels. It would not be an issue. They would not hesitate. People want to know they got something of value, even for $.99 and they prefer to be pleased rather than disappointed with what they get." Bryan Thomas Schmidt | @BryanThomasS

HOW MUCH SHOULD AN EBOOK COST?

"This is the wrong question. The right question is: How much will an ebook cost? Because the answer isn’t up to one author or one publisher or even a price-fixing cartel. It’s up to the market, which is a far more complicated entity. There are no shoulds in the market, just reality. On one hand, the marginal cost of delivering a single ebook is close to zero. It might cost Amazon and B&N a dime to transmit it, but it certainly costs the publisher nothing." The Domino Project

WHAT'S COMING IN 2012: BOOK PUBLISHING

"The e-book pricing debate up to now has generally focused on the idea that all e-books should cost the same and that all should be priced low. But why should a self-published or mass market thriller necessarily cost the same as a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel in e-book form? It doesn’t make sense to me to say that all e-books should cost $9.99 or less." PaidContent | @laurahazardowen

THE HOLIDAY SURPRISE

"So all of those promotions, all of those attempts at the halo effect, all of that work to get new readers into the correct fold, got derailed by authors long dead. This derailment won’t continue. The new readers will learn how their Kindles work. They will realize that they won’t have to buy everything they want immediately in case it goes away, like they did in a brick-and-mortar store. The new readers will learn about sampling, and they’ll learn that they can set up a wish list to keep track of titles that will remain available. And eventually, they’ll become as jaded as the rest of us. But all this planning, all these hopes, all of these attempts to manipulate the new post-Christmas sales season will go awry. Why? Because everyone is doing it." The Business Rusch | @KristineRusch

THE GREAT EBOOK PRICE SWINDLE

"Sure, I can afford the higher prices. But the greed of the publishers has inspired me to make different plans. Now I reserve bestsellers at my local library – run by people who love books: imagine that! – and read them whenever they are available. What were impulse purchases of books that sent revenue to publishers are now impulse reservations that do not. If I have to wait a few weeks, no big deal. I should have remembered that all along." The Guardian | @dangillmor

THE 99-CENT DEBATE: HOW DO WE VALUE OUR WRITING?

"There are a few more issues to consider when pricing an ebook at 99 cents. There seem to be two different schools of thought when it comes to ebook readers: there are those who will only buy 99-cent books, and those who refuse to buy 99-cent books, with the latter group fearing that the cheaply priced book must be of poor quality. Then there’s the belief that pricing simply doesn’t matter, as stated by bestselling author, M.J. Rose, «The emphasis is on the wrong thing. Readers may buy you once for 99c but if they are disappointed they will never buy you again or even download you for free. On the other hand a reader will pay $4.99, $5.99 even up to $12 for an ebook of a writer whose work speaks to her. I’m seeing way too much conversation about what to charge for the book instead of how to write the book. My goal is to write a book so good that a reader will talk about the book and recommend it to all their friends. Quality matters more than ever.»" IndieReader | @Melissa_Foster

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