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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (January, 26)

26 Jan 2012 in international | questo post è lungo 894 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter to get frequent updates. [Previous].

3 IMPORTANT QUESTIONS ABOUT DIGITAL THAT NOBODY IS ASKING

"But price is critical. Make no mistake. Selling online is incredibly price-sensitive and the publishers and authors racking up the sales are the ones who are discovering the pricing sweet-spots within genres, categories and formats, monitoring their pricing versus competitive product and reacting accordingly. Who benefits here? The consumer, who enjoys lower priced product, conscience-free, trusting that publisher wouldn’t be so irresponsible as to make negative margin on a book (that really is an industry responsibility)." FutureBook

WHEN A WEB COMMUNITY BECOMES A BOOK PUBLISHER

"Which means, for authors, a shift in the focus of book promotion from publisher...to community. Being included in a collection is different, obviously, from authoring your own book: It's a different kind of exclusivity, one that's both more passive, and more serendipitous, than first-person-primary authorship. The Longreads book is the product, ultimately, of crowdsourcing -- of collective marketing that ebbs and flows over time. The pieces included in the collection are there because they spread, organically, in the digital space -- through Facebook, through Twitter, through the #longreads hashtag. That's the (completely appropriate) irony of the Longreads book: Its stories are frozen in book form because, marketing-wise, they proved so dynamic." The Atlantic

THE DIGITAL PIRACY PROBLEM IS RIDDLED WITH HYPOCRISY

"For the software industry, tolerance of pirated contents has been part of the ecosystem for quite a while as well. Many of us recall relying on pirated versions of Photoshop, Illustrator or Quark Xpress to learn how to use those products. It is widely assumed that Adobe (NSDQ: ADBE) and Quark have floated new releases of their products to spread the word-of-mouth among creative users. And it worked fine." PaidContent

THE (RIGHT) PRICE FOR EBOOKS

"About prices, there is still a lot to understand. It is a sensitive issue, because it does not concern only the reader’s satisfaction, but also the author survival (who has to be paid) and the maintenance of the system that brings quality to the public (editing, proofreading, packaging, etc.). But above all, it must guarantee the sustainability of those publisher’s investments that are strategic to the reader.Translations, to list one of the most important." IfBookThen | @gg

THE TRUE PRICE OF PUBLISHING

"In other words, publishing is a business that incurs high fixed costs. And it's this, to return to my initial question, that accounts for the high price of (indeed the very existence of) hardbacks. The publisher needs to maximise revenues in order to defray its outlay. Some people are prepared to pay top dollar to have the premium product – a hardcover copy that comes out, crucially, months before other versions. So it makes sense for the publisher to offer it to them." The Guardian

REFLECTIONS ON THE VALUE OF BESTSELLER LISTS VS. THE LONG TAIL

"The key to success in digital publishing is not the immediate success and the bestseller list. It’s the long tail, a broad base of titles, and consistent sales over the years. Where bestseller lists really count is on Amazon if you get on that first page for your genre. That’s called discoverability." Write it Forward | @bob_mayer

PRICING OF SELF-PUBLISHED BOOKS TO INTERNATIONAL READERS

"The perception of $0.99 is not only affected by Kindle Daily Deal, but also by the fact that more and more legacy publishers offer their titles for $1.99 or less. Those books easier become popular, because they convince price-sensitive users not only with a price, but also with a reputation of the publisher. This means that tagging the book with $0.99 price is not as effective as it was a year ago, when there were $0.99 self-published books and $5.99+ books from legacy publishers." Password Incorrect | @namenick

E-BOOK STATISTICS FOR AUTHORS TO WATCH

"What authors should keep an eye on (especially those looking to self-publish): Pay attention to the Kindle Top 100 bestsellers and if the share of self-published titles increases. Also keep an eye on what’s being charged for these titles—because the more that indie authors can charge (and the longer bestseller status can be maintained), the more viable the indie route." Jane Friedman | @janefriedman

WHAT'S BAD FOR PUBLISHERS IS FREAT FOR READERS

"The falling prices of new books caused me to buy more of them. But the collapse of used-book prices brought on by the Web are what really caused my collection to swell. The lower prices changed my relationship with books. I no longer considered each and every volume “my precious.” Yes, I still loved every book, but the Web had made them easily replaceable. In the new order, a book that wasn’t carrying its weight in my collection could lose its spot on the shelf and be shuffled off to a used shop. But now that the Web has driven down the cost of used books, the cash or trade that I was offered rarely made it worth the trip to the shop. So I started tossing books, or if my mother-in-law insisted, I would donate them to the local library book sale." Reuters

BONUS

ReadWriteWeb » Why Apple Won't Disrupt the Textbook Industry Anytime Soon A Newbie's Guide to Publishing » The Myth of the Bestseller A Newbie's Guide to Publishing » The Value of Publicity

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