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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (March, 23)

23 Mar 2012 in international | questo post è lungo 631 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days.
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HOW MUCH DO KINDLE SINGLES AUTHORS MAKE?

"In addition to sharing overall sales information about the Kindle Singles program, Amazon allowed Kindle Singles authors to break their non-disclosure agreements and share their sales figures with me. I chose about a dozen authors, out of the list of over 100 or so, to speak with, and interviewed them without any restrictions from Amazon. Excerpts from the interviews are below."
PaidContent | @laurahazardowen

THE POTENTIAL OF SOCIAL MEDIA IN DRIVING BOOK SALES

"By focusing social media activity around book titles—not the publisher’s imprint or even the author—Facebook pages can facilitate and amplify the kind of word-of-mouth that will resonates with potential consumers. This approach allows publishers to move away from maintaining isolated pages on Facebook and toward a social network of interconnected pages for many books that have overlapping potential readership. In this way, the community around one Facebook book page is continually exposed to new books within this network. Furthermore, this exposure to new books happens within the social space, so when they enter a Facebook book page they can learn which of their friends already liked it. This increases the chances that readers will discover lesser-known titles by leveraging the success of the best-sellers that have already attracted users to the network."
Digital Book World

PRESUMED INANE

"Am I the only one getting the impression that calling Amazon a monopoly is just a tactic to scare authors, when authors should be fearing the disaster that is the Big 6 cartel? The Big 6 are the ones raising prices and giving authors poor royalties. Amazon is giving authors great royalties and lowering prices, which leads to more ebook sales."
A Newbie's Guide to Publishing

LLOYD SHEPHERD: MY PARLEY WITH EBOOK PIRATES

"I decided to go into the main Mobilism forums and start a new topic, called "Novelist seeking understanding". I asked people to explain how they justified to themselves what they were doing, or whether they even needed to. I also wondered whether they thought what they were doing would damage the culture in the long run, if authors became disincentivised to write. It's had some pretty interesting responses."
The Guardian

DIFFERENCES IN SCREEN VS PRINT READING CONTRIBUTING TO ILLITERACY?

"Do we read faster on paper than on the screen? Bob Sutton feels he gets better comprehension out of paper books, and so often buys both paper and electronic copies of volumes he needs to read for research. He was curious enough about this to see if anyone had done studies on the matter.
While he didn’t find any studies on comprehension, he did find studies that suggested the iPad and Kindle offer reading speeds 6 to 10% slower than printed books—though as he noted further down, other studies suggest the advantage may be going away as displays get better. It would be interesting to see how the retina screen of the new iPad 3 compares."
Teleread | @robotech_master

SCARCITY AND ABOUNDANCE

"In an abundance model, scarcity looks like a mistake. Consumers who expect everything they want at their virtual fingertips get angry when they can’t get something. We’re seeing that a lot with traditionally published bestsellers. For a while, traditional publishers tried to release the e-books six months after the print books. All that did was anger the consumer, who wanted their e-book now.
Traditional publishers thought scarcity—the lack of an e-book—would drive consumers to the hardcover. Instead, it made the consumers so mad that they actually wrote nasty online reviews of the books in question. Not a nasty review of a book’s content, mind you, but a nasty review of the book’s lack of availability."
The Business Rusch | @KristineRusch

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