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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (March, 29)

29 Mar 2012 in international | questo post è lungo 686 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter to get frequent updates. [Previous].

Note: don't miss our last interview to Jamie Todd Rubin » To Be Innovative You Have to Know the Rules, First

WHAT'S THE GREATER FEAR FOR PUBLISHERS? AMAZON OR PIRACY?

"Redmayne and Pottermore have now demonstrated that if you will live with the anti-piracy protection of watermarking, rather than insisting on a digital hammerlock through DRM, you can gain extraordinary leverage. Without DRM, as Berlucchi explained, anybody can sell ebooks that can be read on a Kindle. Once Pottermore decided they could live without DRM, they faced Amazon with a very difficult choice. The ebooks were going to go on Kindle devices whether Amazon wanted them there or not. Either they could ignore them or they could play along. I am sure the “play along” deal includes compensation to Amazon for the sales they refer (as it does B&N and, according to a quote from Redmayne, other distribution relations and affiliations will be enabled going forward.)" The Idea Logical Company | @MikeShatzkin

THE DEATH OF THE BOOK

"It looks to me as if people are in fact reading and writing more than they ever did. People who used to work and talk together now work each alone in a cubicle, writing and reading all day long on screen. Communication that used to be oral, face to face or on the telephone, is now written, emailed, and read. None of that has much to do with book-reading, true; yet it’s hard for me to see how the death of the book is to result from the overwhelming prevalence of a technology that makes reading a more invaluable skill than it ever was." Book View Cafe Blog

THE PORTAL PROBLEM AND THE BRITANNICA

"But the obsolescence of print as a research medium is not what has killed the Britannica. The problem Britannica faces is the one faced by all information portals, regardless of format or platform — they tend to offer too much of the wrong kind of value, and too little of the right kind." Teleread, via The Scholarly Kitchen

COPYRIGHT ISN'T DEAD JUST BECAUSE WE'RE NOT WILLING TO LET IT REGULATE US

"The inability of copyright to regulate cultural activity isn't anything new. It's probably true that this inability reduces the profitability of some entities in the entertainment industry's supply chain, just as it increases others'. But that's just a question of profit maximisation, not survival. The problem is that the entertainment companies treated the increased ease of copying in the age of the internet as a signal that copyright should be expanded to cover more people and more activities, far outside of the entertainment industry. What they should have done is picked a new proxy for "this is an industrial activity within copyright's scope" and soldiered on regulating themselves, without trying to regulate the whole world at the same time." The Guardian | @doctorow

HOW AMAZON MADE SELF-PUBLISHING COOL

"The idea that anyone with a laptop and a manuscript can self- publish at the click of a mouse creates visions of a cyberspace clogged with barely literate rants and feeble ideas. The astute reader will point out that this is already the case. How then does a serious writer emerge from the morass and elbow themselves a more prominent place in the queue for recognition and readership?" Stuff.co.nz

HOW TO MAKE A LIVING AS A WRITER

"Making money in this business, for the vast majority of writers, isn’t about having one huge hit. Or even two huge hits. Instead, it’s about building a career, book by book, and building an audience that wants more of your books. Writers begin to see a “living wage” when they have a stack of books out there in the marketplace, each one bringing in royalties regularly. Even if each book is not selling a huge number of copies individually—if you have a whole bunch of books out there, each selling some copies, it starts to add up." Rachelle Gardner | @RachelleGardner

BONUS

Teleread » Harry Potter E-Book Reaction Roundup

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