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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (April, 10)

10 Apr 2012 in international | questo post è lungo 753 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter to get frequent updates. [Previous].

Note: don't miss our last interview to Graham Edwards » Writing means searching for the perfect word, all the time

HOW WE WILL READ: CLAY SHIRKY

"Publishing is not evolving. Publishing is going away. Because the word “publishing” means a cadre of professionals who are taking on the incredible difficulty and complexity and expense of making something public. That’s not a job anymore. That’s a button. There’s a button that says “publish,” and when you press it, it’s done." Findings

PUBLISHING IS NO LONGER A JOB OR AN INDUSTRY - IT'S A BUTTON

"And what are publishers to do amidst this kind of disruption? As Shirky points out in his interview, they need to think about what other kinds of value they can add, apart from the simple act of owning a platform (like a newspaper) or the distribution system for a specific kind of content (like the traditional book-publishing industry). That control — and the ability to manufacture demand or create information scarcity that came along with it — is effectively gone forever." GigaOm

RISE IN E-BOOK READERSHIP IS GOOD NEWS FOR READING OVER ALL, REPORT SAYS

"The report doesn’t try to answer the chicken-or-egg question of whether e-reading devices make their owners more likely to read. The surveys didn’t reveal 'which direction the causal arrow flows in,' Mr. Rainie said. Are avid readers just more likely to buy devices that will allow them to indulge their habit, or 'are the devices themselves bringing people more deeply into reading?'." The Cronicle of Higher Education | @JenHoward

HOW AMAZON IS REDEFINING THE BOOK MARKET

"Today, Amazon sells millions of products across dozens of categories. Its Kindle Fire tablet computer, which Bezos unveiled last year in New York, is seen as another way to hook customers on Amazon's website and digital-media content. Borders, once the nation's second-largest bookstore chain, went out of business last year, and Barnes & Noble, the largest bookstore chain, is staking much of its future on the Nook e-reader. "Amazon can practically give books away to get customers, and then it can make money on them by selling them potato chips and computers," said Shatzkin, the publishing consultant. "There's nobody in the book business that can compete with that."" InsideRetail

IS THERE A FUTURE FOR DEDICATED EREADERS?

"The key ingredient is something called subsidization. The Kindle Fire sells for $199, but sources tell us that the bill of materials (BOM) for the Kindle Fire is at least $215.00. But Amazon is willing to sell it at this price because they expect a Kindle Fire buyer to purchase perhaps at last 10 ebooks, rent at least 5 movies and buy various products through the Kindle Fire from the Amazon store that they can amortize against the actual cost of the Kindle Fire and actually make a profit on it." Tech.Pinions | @tech.pinions

WILL BE READY WHEN THAT OTHER TYPE OF DISRUPTION COMES?

"A “disruptive technology” is one that usually preserves the output the market desires, but reshuffles the underlying value chain in such a way that old players are sidelined and new ones emerge. Think steel mini-mills replacing massive steel mills — the market still wanted and got steel of all types (rebar, sheet, coil), but the incumbent steel manufacturers were displaced by mini-mills that chewed their way up from the bottom. Think e-books replacing print books, where we are seeing much the same story. For scholarly publishers, think online platform purveyors supplanting printers. In our world, online is a disruptive technology for printers, not for publishers. Disruption depends on where you sit in the value chain, but if you own the retail interface, so to speak, you have to worry about a different flavor of disruption." The Scholarly Kitchen

AMAZON A 'DANGEROUS' FORCE, SAYS OTTAKAR'S FOUNDER

"'If you are concerned about the sort of books that get published you have to look to the future and the amount of value that businesses like Amazon can remove from the publishing business model,' said James Heneage, the businessman turned author who started the quirky Ottakar's chain in the late 80s. 'If you look at great writers such as Patrick O'Brian and Joanna Trollope, these people did not start out as uniquely brilliant. Their [following] built gradually because publishers worked with them and had the money to invest, and pay for the expertise that spotted the books in the first place.'" The Guardian

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