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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (May, 15)

15 May 2012 in international | questo post è lungo 1222 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter to get frequent updates. [Previous].

Note: don't miss our last interview to Ken Liu » We Use Narrative As a Way to Make Sense of the World

THE FUTURE OF READING AND PUBLISHING ACCORDING TO AMAZON

"«The question is not, will reading become increasingly digital, that seems very likely. The question then becomes for the people who add value and try to be useful to authors and readers – and that includes publishers and booksellers – how do you evolve being useful in a digital world? … Nobody in publishing was thinking about whether their authors needed a Twitter feed five or 10 years ago, but it’s probably something they’re thinking a lot about now. Publishers will have to explore how to listen to authors, observe what sells books and find a way to adapt and be useful in that scenario.»" Macleans.ca | @peternowak

THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES IN THE NEW ERA OF PUBLISHING

"I actually think authors have a good situation in the new era, because everyone will have a chance to be heard. But, unfortunately, not all chances are going to be created equal. There will still be a big difference between a book launched with a major publicity campaign and a book anonymously and quietly uploaded to Amazon. In any situation where there is a great deal of choice people tend to retreat to trusted brands, and I think that's going to be true of the new era. Megabestsellers and celebrities will continue to sell more, and everyone else may find it difficult to stand out." Nathan Bransford | @NathanBransford

9 SIGNS SELF-PUBLISHING IS OUT OF CONTROL

"To paraphrase the immortal words of Truman Capote, there’s a difference between writing and typing. And, to put it gently, we can say with a good amount of confidence that most self-published books were typed, not written. Because communicating with letters assembled into words is a skill most learn by the age of 5, and because written communication has become so ubiquitous in American life, everyone now thinks he’s a writer. Until recently, the publishing industry had been our sea wall, protecting us from a tidal wave of boring life stories and dreadful novels. But now, the ease of self-publishing threatens to drown us all in mediocrity. Here are nine signs the situation is out of control." Accredited Online Colleges

WHERE IS PUBLISHING HEADED?: THE FUTURE OF BOOKS IN 7 EASY STEPS

"So where is book publishing now headed? Will the traditional print-on-paper book become a relic of a bygone age, a collector's item to be found only in second-hand bookstores and garage sales, much like the old vinyl LP? Will publishers - and perhaps agents too - be displaced by a flourishing of self-publishing and by powerful online retailers like Amazon who can offer to publish writers' work on royalty terms that are much more favorable than those traditionally offered by publishing houses?" Huffington Post

THE REINVENTION OF THE BOOKSELLER

"These days most bookstores have some sort of coffee shop or snack bar. Years ago it was a brilliant move to add that dimension, as it helped turn bookstores into a hangout rather than just an in-and-out retail destination. If in-store coffee shops were the game-changing idea of the '90s, what's the new one for the current decade? Here's one possibility: an in-store self-publishing resource. Self-publishing is red-hot and still gaining momentum. But what's sorely lacking in the self-publishing world is a reliable place to go to ask all the questions. How do I get started? What's the best platform? How do I create a marketing campaign? Self-publishing enthusiasts are left with a slew of questionable online options and a few in-person events. Why not create an in-person self-publishing resource within your store?" O'Reilly Radar | @jwikert

WHAT WILL BECOME OF THE PAPER BOOK?

"In the past several years, we’ve all heard readers mourn the passing of the printed word. The elegy is familiar: I crave the smell of a well-worn book, the weight of it in my hands; all of my favorite books I discovered through loans from a friend, that minor but still-significant ritual of trust; I need to see it on my shelf after I’ve read it (and I don’t mind if others see it too); and what is a classic if not a book where I’m forced to rediscover my own embarrassing college-age marginalia?" Slate

DIGITAL READING: GETTING AGILE ABOUT BOOKS

"So why is agile methodology being applied to book development? Because in our current cultural environment of instant downloads, regular updates and reader feedback, the leisurely process of making a book and the siloed organizational structure within publishing houses have come to be obstacles to success. Publishers could certainly benefit from greater speed, accuracy, functionality, end-user satisfaction; perhaps agile development methods can deliver them." Digital Book World | @bklynanne

OF BROOMS AND BONDAGE

"Now readers can go online to berate overhyped books that fail to thrill. “It’s a lot harder for a publisher to sustain an illusion of a big new success,” Mr Rickett observes. And thanks to social media, word of mouth spreads faster than ever before, giving unknown writers a better shot. Today, a bestseller must usually appeal either to young people (who use social media a lot) or women (who dominate reading groups)." The Economist

NOBODY CARES ABOUT THE FIXED COSTS OF YOUR BOOK, MOVIE, WHATEVER

"They only care about the value to them of the single copy they get. And this makes sense for a variety of reasons, both economically and psychologically. This is the point that economists have been making for ages, trying to get people to understand the difference between fixed costs and marginal costs. Fixed costs don't impact pricing. Maginal costs (the cost to produce the copy) do. That's not to say that the fixed costs aren't important -- they are -- but they don't factor into the pricing decision, they factor into the investment decision. That is, you don't take on a project if you don't think you can create a business model that will give a total return on investment over the fixed and marginal costs. But the pricing on the individual item is entirely about the marginal costs. And this is actually a good thing. If you did pricing based on the average cost, including fixed costs, you actually lose the incentive to be more efficient and lower your fixed costs, since you get to just bake them into the price. But the public doesn't care about how much you spent. As far as they're concerned, you may have spent stupidly and inefficiently. They only care about the marginal benefit they get from the copy." TechDirt

IT DOESEN'T MATTER WHAT E-BOOKS COST TO MAKE

"Consumers don’t really care what a publisher’s costs are, nor are they likely to pay more simply because a publisher argues that their content is really valuable. In the same way, movie-goers don’t really care how many millions of dollars a movie studio spent on their latest blockbuster — that has no bearing on whether they want to see it or not. It is the perceived value of the e-book that matters, not the cost — and there are some good reasons why e-book consumers might want to pay less." GigaOm

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