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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (September, 18)

18 Sep 2012 in international | questo post è lungo 644 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter to get frequent updates. [Previous]

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE PUBLISHED NOW?

"I can’t really say what “publication” means, but I do know that it’s changing fast, and not to the worse, just to something more acclimated to the current weather. I also don’t know where the balance lies between, say, digital and nondigital publishing for a writer, but I doubt that it was ever easy for a writer to straddle the fences that crisscross the reality of writing or to find the right way to talk to everyone who has staked a claim in the land of story-making." Marcus Speh

PIRACY IS "THE NEW RADIO" WAY TO GET YOUR MUSIC HEARD

"It doesn't affect me because I look at the internet as the new radio," Young said in January. "I look at the radio as gone ... Piracy is the new radio. That's how music gets around ... That's the radio. If you really want to hear it, let's make it available, let them hear it, let them hear the 95 percent of it." The Huffington Post

5 REASONS WHY INNOVATORS SHOULD BE READING MORE SCIFI AND FEWER TECH BLOGS

"When in search for disruptive innovation on a societal scale, scifi is best. It provides me with coherent, complete worlds where a finished innovation is used by an actual society. It breaks all the context barriers; it defines ideas, products, services, networks, and new scientific paradigms in context, in a fake but real world. It lets me imagine stuff without boundaries. And it can give pretty solid and strong insight on what technology might become." FaberNovel | @fabernovel

THE PROBLEM OF AUDIENCE APPEARS TO EXIST FOR EVERYONE

"Interestingly, the problem of audience appears to exist for everyone. Including media outlets. It fascinates me that Yahoo! bought Associated Content, that HuffPo and Forbes allow you to start blogging under their rubric in your field of expertise, that CNN launched a citizen journalist service called iReport. It fascinates me that Social Media Today offers content communities in so many other fields, too, beyond social media: entrepreneurship, climate change and energy policy, healthcare, corporate responsibility. It makes sense. It's a natural step in the evolution of the Web's self-publishing promise, which has always required three distinct things: the means to publish (technology), something to say (content), and visibility (an audience)." Social Media Today

WILL PAPER GO AWAY? IF WE’RE SMART WE WON’T LET IT

"It took a while before I figured it out. As authors shifted from mechanical typing to electronic word processing, they were no longer editing their work as they used to. The introduction of automatic spell checking only aggravated the problem. Authors were losing the vital skill of self criticism. Many, perhaps most, forewent printing their work out and reviewing it in hard copy, and they were losing the “feel” of print. If they’d troubled to scrutinize their manuscripts on paper they might easily have seen overblown descriptions, overwrought dialogues and unnecessary repetitions. But the computer was making life too easy for them." [e-reads]

WILLIAM GIBSON ON WHY SCI-FI WRITERS ARE (THANKFULLY) ALMOST ALWAYS WRONG

"I think the least important thing about science fiction for me is its predictive capacity. Its record for being accurately predictive is really, really poor! If you look at the whole history of science fiction, what people have said is going to happen, what writers have said is going to happen, and what actually happened — it’s terrible. We’re almost always wrong. Our reputation for being right relies on some human capacity to marvel at the times when, yay, you got it right! Arthur Clarke predicted communications satellites and things like that. Those are marvelous — it’s great when someone gets it right, but almost always it’s wrong." Wired | @geetadayal

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