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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (September, 26)

26 Sep 2012 in international | questo post è lungo 445 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter to get frequent updates. [Previous]

HOW TECHNOLOGY HAS CHANGED STORIES IN MY LIFE

"Over the last couple decades, I’ve watched technology do a lot for storytelling both in the world, and in my personal everyday life. In my opinion, “interactivity” is really only the tip of the iceberg, and not even a necessarily very interesting one at that." The Digital Reader | @robotech_master

BOOK DISCOVERY LANDSCAPE BECOMES MORE COMPLICATED AS READER BEHAVIOR FRACTURES

"Imagine the complexity: a 27-year-old female romance reader from suburban Indianapolis who reads on a tablet computer but spends most of her time browsing the Web on her laptop versus a 43-year-old female romance reader living in Los Angeles who reads and buys exclusively on her e-reader. They’re both romance readers and female, but couldn’t be more different otherwise when it comes to how they discover and read books — and reaching them takes different marketing tactics." Digital Book World

JK ROWLING AND THE PUBLISHERS' MOAN

"Turning authors into brands is nothing new. Publishers will say it's necessary in an industry struggling to cope with narrowing margins. Publishing today is less Tweed and more Snipcock: this castration of literary editors is undignified and rude. But the real losers in all this are the readers." The Independent

ARE BOOKS THE NEW BUSINESS CARDS? E-PUBLISHING MAKES IT EASIER THAN EVER TO BUY CREDIBILITY

“People have a lot of illusions about how publishing works,” says Ryan Holiday, an author and contributing writer to Forbes and Fast Company. “If you write a book, the benefits aren’t necessarily that you’re going to make money from selling copies of it; that sort of business is out of reach for the majority of authors. The benefits are the prestige, the credibility and the access the book gets you.” The Vancouver Sun

THE POWER OF DEFINING THE PROBLEM

"Well-defined problems lead to breakthrough solutions. When developing new products, processes, or even businesses, most companies aren't sufficiently rigorous in defining the problems they're attempting to solve and articulating why those issues are important. Without that rigor, organizations miss opportunities, waste resources, and end up pursuing innovation initiatives that aren't aligned with their strategies. How many times have you seen a project go down one path only to realize in hindsight that it should have gone down another? How many times have you seen an innovation program deliver a seemingly breakthrough result only to find that it can't be implemented or it addresses the wrong problem? Many organizations need to become better at asking the right questions so that they tackle the right problems." Harvard Business Review

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