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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (October, 01)

01 Oct 2012 in international | questo post è lungo 680 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter to get frequent updates. [Previous]

ARE PUBLISHERS MAKING A KILLING ON E-BOOKS?

"Few subjects have elicited as much wild conjecture as the prices of e-books. Reading rabid allegations of price-gouging, one has to wonder what these critics know about manufacturing costs that we in the e-book industry don’t. Following the proverb Don’t judge another until you’ve walked a mile in his shoes, it might be educational for you to imagine what it would cost you to duplicate the processes that at least one publisher – my own, E-Reads – performs to get a book into the marketplace from raw state to finished product." Digital Book World

WHY BOOK BLOGGERS ARE CRITICAL TO LITERARY CRITICISM

"The greatest tool bloggers have at their disposal – to be exercised with caution – is space. Former fiction editor of the TLS, Lindsay Duguid, said that "in a short review, you can probably only get over three points". A blog can explore a book at a length that all but the most prominent literary critics would envy. Today, social networking sites encourage expression to be short and punchy, not balanced and thoughtful. The Man Booker prize this year removed the users' forum from its revamped site, and now limits reader responses to the books to Facebook comments and tweets. In such circumstances, the opportunity that blogs continue to offer for long-form engagement with literature should not be denigrated, but celebrated." The Guardian

BOOK BLOGGERS: ARE THEY KILLING LIT CRITICISM, OR SAVING IT?

"And I think there’s probably something else to consider here, as well: In 2012—in the very globalized and multicultured world in which we all live—do we really need one more middle-aged, middle-class white guy telling us what we should be reading, and why? I tend to think not. But then again, I’m essentially a middle-aged, middle-class white guy myself. So what do I know?" TeleRead

THE FUTURE OF THE AUTHOR-PUBLISHER RELATIONSHIP

"The future I would like to propose is one in which the publisher truly serves as a partner that seeks to empower its authors, and freely shares as much knowledge and information as it has available. Those of us who have worked in publishing know that publishers are rarely forthcoming with authors about marketing plans or sales data, and we hold back information—we don’t want to open up “a can of worms.” But this mindset can’t survive in a future where each author expects full transparency and up-to-date information from business partners, not to mention trust and respect. Authors shouldn’t be told they are responsible for marketing and promotion while not be given all the tools needed to be successful at the task, but that is exactly what is happening today. Authors will have too many options to accept such a situation in the future." Litflow

WATCHING THE NUMBERS

"Am I ever going to get all of the world’s English speakers to read my books? Hell, no. I’m not even going to get a statistically meaningful percentage of them to read my books. But already, my books are being read in countries where they were previously unavailable, not only because of Amazon, but because of Kobo, Apple, and a bunch of other small companies that partner with Smashwords and such places. My biggest problem as a business person right now? Keeping up with all of the developing markets for my fiction. Making sure my work is available in as many places as possible is something I’m continually falling behind on, as more and more and more markets appear." Kristine Kathryn Rusch

WHAT DO HARVARD BUSINESS PUBLISHING AND HARLEQUIN HAVE IN COMMON?

"As a reader, writer, and passionate follower of all things book-related, the narrow thinking about audience of most of the traditional publishers has always mystified me. More recently, I’ve become alarmed as audiences have continued to fracture and shrink. It’s harder and harder for any but the most established authors to find audiences and the traditional publishers seem absurdly myopic and unhelpful in this regard." Forbes

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