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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (October, 24)

24 Oct 2012 in international | questo post è lungo 697 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter to get frequent updates. [Previous]

IAN MCEWAN CLAIMS THE NOVELLA IS BETTER THAN THE NOVEL

"Booker prize-winning author Ian McEwan believes the novella is the superior literary form to the novel. The author told an audience at Cheltenham Literary Festival over the weekend, "If I could write the perfect novella I would die happy." McEwan said that publishers and critics feel there is something 'unmanly' about a novella: "Whenever I've handed in a novella there's always someone to give you a kick in the shins, as if you've made a mistake." The Telegraph

THE COMING PUBLISHING RENAISSANCE

"Today, we’re seeing a similar transition for publications. The distribution model is changing—just as it did for music and movies. Instead of focusing solely on paper circulation statistics, forward-thinking publishers are beginning to embrace a future in which they distribute their publications to platforms for the iPad, iPhone, Android, Kindle, Nexus and more to deliver content on-demand. And this change enables new monetization opportunities since publications can now target audiences more effectively according to their interests." Teleread

DEBATING TEN WAYS TO SAVE THE BOOK PUBLISHING INDUSTRY

"The point I’m making is that, though publishing must radically reform the way it publishes in order to take more chances with what it publishes, systemic change will never replace the need for intelligent, creative work in selecting and developing books. That’s why publishing remains an often joyful occupation." Digital Book World

ARE E-READER COMPANIES EXPANDING TOO FAST?

"The core question is “Are e-reader companies expanding too fast?” Barnes and Noble has suffered from many glitches in its online store that prevented its launch. Kobo experienced a negative backlash in Japan and has never recovered from the way Rakuten handled everything. Amazon does not deliver its range of tablets outside two different countries and suffers from inventory shortage. [...] Obviously, it is very hard to anticipate global and regional demand. Retailers often find themselves not having the hardware at the launch date. Manufacturing issues are also a huge problem, as component shortages have rendered Amazon incapable of meeting USA demand." Good Ereader

THE PROFITABLE BUSINESS OF KINDLE BOOK LENDING

"As ever with rows involving the book business, the argument boiled down to money: namely how much Amazon would pay the publisher per e-book, and whether by negotiating a different ‘rate’ for open-ended e-book loans rather than sales, publishers risked further devaluing their own businesses. I would argue, however, that the way the Kindle Lending Library has developed to date makes it a minor victory for publishers. In its coverage of the UK launch last week, The Bookseller reported that Amazon was paying publishers the standard wholesale rate for each e-book ‘borrowed’ via the Kindle Lending Library. And the fact that the company many publishing insiders only half-jokingly refer to as Voldemort has agreed to do this suggests it needs the content enough to let publishers set the margins." Teleread

WHY DOES THE SHORT STORY SURVIVE?

"«Journals are designed for the medium. Lorin has made the point that what magazines were created for—they were, essentially, paced to the length of a commute—no longer exists. Now, reading them is a conscious and deliberate choice rather than a matter of routine. But the idea of curation, and of reading these works in a particular physical context is very special. It adds a sense of import to the experience. On a basic level, in a world where there are fewer places to submit short fiction, magazines like ours are vitally important.»" The Atlantic

TEACHERS MAKE MONEY SELLING MATERIALS ONLINE

"Dozens of Internet forums have been created to help teachers distribute their material and pick up ideas from other educators. Teacherspayteachers.com is one of the biggest. It was started by a former teacher in New York in 2006 and quickly grew. Others followed, like the sharemylesson.com run by the American Federation of Teachers, the nation’s second largest teachers union, where free curriculum ideas and materials are offered. While most characterize these sites as an inexpensive way for teachers to supplement textbook materials, some teachers may get pushback from administrators for their entrepreneurial efforts." Boston.com

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