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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (November, 15)

15 Nov 2012 in international | questo post è lungo 691 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter to get frequent updates. [Previous]

Note: don't miss our last interviews to Kassia Kroszer, Brian O'Leary, Joel Friedlander and Joanna Penn!

THE TRANSFORMATION OF PUBLISHING

"When cultural historians eventually come to describe the years 1990 to 2012, they will be hard put to resist phrases such as "paradigm shift", "literary upheaval", and "IT revolution". No question: my generation has seen a transformation in the world of letters unequalled since the days of Gutenberg. What's more, it has happened at warp speed." The Guardian

SIZE DOESN'T MATTER IN PUBLISHING

"I can appreciate a publisher’s desire to minimize Amazon’s influence. But, there is a fundamental flaw with trying to compete against Amazon using a merger strategy. No matter how big a publisher gets, Amazon still controls direct access to the consumer. And, the one who goes direct to the consumer ultimately wins. All of the Big Six publishers could merge into one giant entity, but that wouldn’t prevent Amazon from maintaining leverage." Digital Book World

BOOK PUBLISHING CRISIS: CAPITALISM KILLS CULTURE

"But the implications are larger. If you work in, say, journalism, or the music business, you’ve seen this kind of thing before: the erosion and then collapse of an industry, often after mergers and acquisitions announced with buzzwords – “synergy”! – or reassurances that new ownership means that nothing significant will change because, after all, we really value the kind of work you people do. Will publishing continue to slide, gradually, or will it fall apart, like newspapers – which have lost approximately a third of their staffs since the recession and seen advertising revenue sink to 1953 levels — and record labels – where annual sales of the top-10 albums have gone from over 60 million to about 20 million in roughly a decade. Members of the creative class have been here, and it hasn’t worked out real well for them." Salon

LOSS & GAIN, OR THE FATE OF THE BOOK

"People of the book, such as I, not only believe that the replacement of the page by the screen will alter human character, thin it out, empty it of depth, but secretly hope this happens. A deterioration in human character consequent upon the demise of the book will be, for the inveterate reader, an apologia pro vita sua. For we who have spent so much of our lives with, and even for books secretly derived a sense of moral superiority from having done so. This is obvious from the fact that no one says “Young people nowadays do not read” in a tone other than of lament or, more usually, moral condemnation. A person who does not read—and for us reading means books—is a mental barbarian, a man who, wittingly or unwittingly, confines himself to his own experience, necessarily an infinitesimal proportion of all possible experiences. He is not only a barbarian, but an egotist." The New Criterion

WANT TO BE READ 100 YEARS FROM NOW? HERE'S HOW.

"So, you want to be an artist. You want to be one of those writers everyone has read, even though you’re long dead. You want your work in libraries, on bookstore shelves, and in digital format. You want professors to assign your work, or kids to sneak that “crap” that everyone decries but everyone loves." Business Rusch

A GAME WITHOUT RULES

"What is fascinating about international literary prizes is that the obstacles to choosing between writers coming from different cultures and working in different languages are so evident and daunting as to render the task almost futile; yet such is the appetite for international prizes and for winners that people do everything possible to overlook this. So what is the underlying purpose of these prizes? To what extent are novelists—like athletes in the Olympics, or soccer players in the World Cup—being asked to contribute to the building of a vast and for the moment largely imaginary global culture? In what way does this change the kind of literature that gets written, and the way it is written and talked about?" The New York Review of Books

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