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Best Links for Writers and Publishers (November, 27)

27 Nov 2012 in international | questo post è lungo 649 parole

Change in Publishing: links you may have missed in the last days. Follow us on Twitter to get frequent updates. [Previous]

Note: don't miss our last interviews to Kassia Kroszer, Brian O'Leary, Joel Friedlander and Joanna Penn!

WHY IT'S TIME FOR MORE TRANSPARENCY IN PUBLISHING

"The self-publishing environment is full of authors with entrepreneurial spirit sharing openly. We discuss sales numbers and promote each other through blog posts and social networks, especially when our books are in the same genre. Because in this environment, it’s about co-opetition, when parties with similar interests cooperate to create higher value together than they can apart. In learning together, we can fail faster, respond and adapt more quickly.

Publishers can do the same thing, and are beginning to by sharing information at conferences like FutureBook, but a wider adoption of co-opetition would hasten the process." The Future Book

WHY WE LOVE SHORT STORIES

"This is what I love about them: their ability to to give us everything we expect in a novel, but in the time it takes between tea and bed or for the doctor to call your name in the waiting room. They are able to suck you into another world as quickly as they spit you back out. They can have a beginning, a middle and an end, with characters that you'll love and ones you'll hate. They can make you laugh or cry, scared or shocked. Sometimes they can be even more powerful than a normal book, as their concentrated form will make you really think about what is being said." The Guardian

THE STRANGE CASE OF THE DROWNING EDITOR

"There are almost no editors left who are willing or able to sign something up because they love it, because they can see how to make it work and because their seniority and record of success gives them the right to expect the occasional hunch to be trusted. Every single book is bought by committee – but of course the vast majority are rejected by committee and so the fundamental quality of an editor, their taste, is called into question time and time again by marketing, sales and publicity." The FutureBook

CAN BOOKS ENDURE IN A 140-CHARACTER WORLD?

"Of course, getting into a narrative requires concentration. Although it’s hard to focus in these times, that doesn’t mean that we have to abandon literature; we just need to package it in a new context. Instead of spending five months immersed in Proust, the visual and auditory quality of social media makes it possible to spend five minutes getting your mind blown by a contemporary philosopher. Quality, not quantity, is the key. Luckily, a new generation of poets, writers and thinkers is emerging, and they are conveying the resonant messages of longer-form literature through the hyperkinetic delivery methods of social media." Salon

THE BATTLE FOR THE BOOKS (EXCERPT)

"By definition, there is no market for millions of forgotten, out-of-print books; their contents offer endless opportunities for personal enrichment, but no equivalent financial richness. Scanning the world’s books presented, at best, a negligible business opportunity along with some very foreseeable legal headaches. So why did Google bother?" GigaOm

ALL SIX MEGA-PUBLISHERS CAN MERGE, AND THEY STILL WON'T WIN AMAZON'S GAME

"The reason that publishers find themselves in a war of out-bidding for boneheaded celebrity books, eroding their own profit margins with every bid, is that they were the ones who opted to grow the easy way. The industry was built on discovering, developing, and painstakingly promoting young talent. As the firms have gotten bigger, those uncertain ROIs have been slashed in favor of what looks like a sure thing. Everything else is slashed. No author gets truly great editing out of publishing houses anymore, and most of the promotional work falls to the author once the book comes out — even when a major house has paid a healthy six-figure advance." PandoDaily

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